Social Chemosignaling: The scent of a handshake

1 figure

Figures

After a handshake, the volunteers spent more time with their hand held in the vicinity of the nose.

The spatial distribution of the contact between the right hand and the face following a greeting with a handshake, or without a handshake. Red indicates the areas where hand touching increased in many of the volunteers after the greeting; dark blue indicates areas where it decreased. Turquoise indicates areas where little or no change in hand touching was observed.

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  1. Gün R Semin
  2. Ana Rita Farias
(2015)
Social Chemosignaling: The scent of a handshake
eLife 4:e06758.
https://doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06758