1. Cell Biology
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Crumbs is an essential regulator of cytoskeletal dynamics and cell-cell adhesion during dorsal closure in Drosophila

  1. David Flores-Benitez
  2. Elisabeth Knust  Is a corresponding author
  1. Max-Planck-Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics, Germany
Research Article
  • Cited 25
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Cite this article as: eLife 2015;4:e07398 doi: 10.7554/eLife.07398

Abstract

The evolutionarily conserved Crumbs protein is required for epithelial polarity and morphogenesis. Here we identify a novel role of Crumbs as a negative regulator of actomyosin dynamics during dorsal closure in the Drosophila embryo. Embryos carrying a mutation in the FERM (protein 4.1/ezrin/radixin/moesin) domain-binding motif of Crumbs die due to an overactive actomyosin network associated with disrupted adherens junctions. This phenotype is restricted to the amnioserosa and does not affect other embryonic epithelia. This function of Crumbs requires DMoesin, the Rho1-GTPase, class-I p21-activated kinases and the Arp2/3 complex. Data presented here point to a critical role of Crumbs in regulating actomyosin dynamics, cell junctions and morphogenesis.

Article and author information

Author details

  1. David Flores-Benitez

    Max-Planck-Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics, Dresden, Germany
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  2. Elisabeth Knust

    Max-Planck-Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics, Dresden, Germany
    For correspondence
    knust@mpi-cbg.de
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.

Reviewing Editor

  1. K VijayRaghavan, National Centre for Biological Sciences, Tata Institute for Fundamental Research, India

Publication history

  1. Received: March 10, 2015
  2. Accepted: November 6, 2015
  3. Accepted Manuscript published: November 6, 2015 (version 1)
  4. Version of Record published: January 13, 2016 (version 2)

Copyright

© 2015, Flores-Benitez & Knust

This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License permitting unrestricted use and redistribution provided that the original author and source are credited.

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