1. Microbiology and Infectious Disease
  2. Plant Biology
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An effector of the Irish potato famine pathogen antagonizes a host autophagy cargo receptor

  1. Yasin F Dagdas
  2. Khaoula Belhaj
  3. Abbas Maqbool
  4. Angela Chaparro-Garcia
  5. Pooja Pandey
  6. Benjamin Petre
  7. Nadra Tabassum
  8. Neftaly Cruz-Mireles
  9. Richard K Hughes
  10. Jan Sklenar
  11. Joe Win
  12. Frank Menke
  13. Kim Findlay
  14. Mark J Banfield
  15. Sophien Kamoun  Is a corresponding author
  16. Tolga O Bozkurt
  1. The Sainsbury Laboratory, United Kingdom
  2. John Innes Centre, United Kingdom
  3. Imperial College London, United Kingdom
Research Article
  • Cited 91
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Cite this article as: eLife 2016;5:e10856 doi: 10.7554/eLife.10856

Abstract

Plants use autophagy to safeguard against infectious diseases. However, how plant pathogens interfere with autophagy related processes is unknown. Here we show that PexRD54, an effector from the Irish potato famine pathogen Phytophthora infestans, binds host autophagy protein ATG8CL to stimulate autophagosome formation. PexRD54 depletes the autophagy cargo receptor Joka2 out of ATG8CL complexes and interferes with Joka2's positive effect on pathogen defense. Thus a plant pathogen effector has evolved to antagonize a host autophagy cargo receptor in order to counteract host defenses.

Article and author information

Author details

  1. Yasin F Dagdas

    The Sainsbury Laboratory, Norwich, United Kingdom
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  2. Khaoula Belhaj

    The Sainsbury Laboratory, Norwich, United Kingdom
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  3. Abbas Maqbool

    Department of Biological Chemistry, John Innes Centre, Norwich, United Kingdom
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  4. Angela Chaparro-Garcia

    The Sainsbury Laboratory, Norwich, United Kingdom
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  5. Pooja Pandey

    Department of Life Sciences, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  6. Benjamin Petre

    The Sainsbury Laboratory, Norwich, United Kingdom
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  7. Nadra Tabassum

    Department of Life Sciences, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  8. Neftaly Cruz-Mireles

    The Sainsbury Laboratory, Norwich, United Kingdom
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  9. Richard K Hughes

    Department of Biological Chemistry, John Innes Centre, Norwich, United Kingdom
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  10. Jan Sklenar

    The Sainsbury Laboratory, Norwich, United Kingdom
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  11. Joe Win

    The Sainsbury Laboratory, Norwich, United Kingdom
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  12. Frank Menke

    The Sainsbury Laboratory, Norwich, United Kingdom
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  13. Kim Findlay

    Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, John Innes Centre, Norwich, United Kingdom
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  14. Mark J Banfield

    Department of Biological Chemistry, John Innes Centre, Norwich, United Kingdom
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  15. Sophien Kamoun

    The Sainsbury Laboratory, Norwich, United Kingdom
    For correspondence
    sophien.kamoun@tsl.ac.uk
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  16. Tolga O Bozkurt

    The Sainsbury Laboratory, Norwich, United Kingdom
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.

Reviewing Editor

  1. Jean T Greenberg, University of Chicago, United States

Publication history

  1. Received: August 15, 2015
  2. Accepted: January 13, 2016
  3. Accepted Manuscript published: January 14, 2016 (version 1)
  4. Version of Record published: February 23, 2016 (version 2)
  5. Version of Record updated: October 6, 2016 (version 3)

Copyright

© 2016, Dagdas et al.

This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License permitting unrestricted use and redistribution provided that the original author and source are credited.

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