1. Microbiology and Infectious Disease
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Malaria: Looking for blood

  1. Pauline Formaglio
  2. Rogerio Amino  Is a corresponding author
  1. Otto-von-Guericke University, Germany
  2. Institut Pasteur, France
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Cite this article as: eLife 2015;4:e11284 doi: 10.7554/eLife.11284
1 figure and 1 video

Figures

Malaria parasites moving near blood vessels in the skin.

The paths followed by parasites in the dermis were tracked over a period of 145 seconds and then projected onto the image of blood vessels (white) from the same field of view. The paths followed by six different parasites are shown in six colours from their starting position (left) to their final position (right). The blue, yellow and red parasites display the slow and constrained ‘perivascular motility’ around blood vessels described by Hopp et al. On the other hand, the green, cyan and magenta parasites exhibit ‘avascular motility’, which is characterized by a faster migration and less confined trajectories. The imaged area measures 190 µm by 190 µm.

IMAGE CREDIT: PAULINE FORMAGLIO.

Videos

Video 1
Malaria parasites moving near blood vessels in the skin.

See Figure 1 for details. Video credit: Pauline Formaglio.

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