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A non canonical subtilase attenuates the transcriptional activation of defence responses in Arabidopsis thaliana

  1. Irene Serrano
  2. Pierre Buscaill
  3. Corinne Audran
  4. Cécile Pouzet
  5. Alain Jauneau
  6. Susana Rivas  Is a corresponding author
  1. LIPM, Université de Toulouse, INRA, CNRS, France
  2. Fédération de Recherche 3450, Plateforme Imagerie, Pôle de Biotechnologie Végétale, France
Research Article
  • Cited 13
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Cite this article as: eLife 2016;5:e19755 doi: 10.7554/eLife.19755

Abstract

Proteases play crucial physiological functions in all organisms by controlling the lifetime of proteins. Here, we identified an atypical protease of the subtilase family [SBT5.2(b)] that attenuates the transcriptional activation of plant defence independently of its protease activity. The SBT5.2 gene produces two distinct transcripts encoding a canonical secreted subtilase [SBT5.2(a)] and an intracellular protein [SBT5.2(b)]. Concomitant to SBT5.2(a) downregulation, SBT5.2(b) expression is induced after bacterial inoculation. SBT5.2(b) localizes to endosomes where it interacts with and retains the defence-related TF MYB30. Nuclear exclusion of MYB30 results in its reduced transcriptional activation and, thus, suppressed resistance. sbt5.2 mutants, with abolished SBT5.2(a) and SBT5.2(b) expression, display enhanced defence that is suppressed in a myb30 mutant background. Moreover, overexpression of SBT5.2(b), but not SBT5.2(a), in sbt5.2 plants reverts the phenotypes displayed by sbt5.2 mutants. Overall, we uncover a regulatory mode of the transcriptional activation of defence responses previously undescribed in eukaryotes.

Article and author information

Author details

  1. Irene Serrano

    LIPM, Université de Toulouse, INRA, CNRS, Castanet-Tolosan, France
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  2. Pierre Buscaill

    LIPM, Université de Toulouse, INRA, CNRS, Castanet-Tolosan, France
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  3. Corinne Audran

    LIPM, Université de Toulouse, INRA, CNRS, Castanet-Tolosan, France
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  4. Cécile Pouzet

    Fédération de Recherche 3450, Plateforme Imagerie, Pôle de Biotechnologie Végétale, Castanet-Tolosan, France
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  5. Alain Jauneau

    Fédération de Recherche 3450, Plateforme Imagerie, Pôle de Biotechnologie Végétale, Castanet-Tolosan, France
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  6. Susana Rivas

    LIPM, Université de Toulouse, INRA, CNRS, Castanet-Tolosan, France
    For correspondence
    susana.rivas@toulouse.inra.fr
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0002-2549-7346

Funding

Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique and Agreenskills

  • Irene Serrano

Freach Ministry of National Education and Research

  • Pierre Buscaill

The funders had no role in study design, data collection and interpretation, or the decision to submit the work for publication.

Reviewing Editor

  1. Gary Stacey, University of Missouri, United States

Publication history

  1. Received: July 17, 2016
  2. Accepted: September 28, 2016
  3. Accepted Manuscript published: September 29, 2016 (version 1)
  4. Version of Record published: October 21, 2016 (version 2)

Copyright

© 2016, Serrano et al.

This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License permitting unrestricted use and redistribution provided that the original author and source are credited.

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