1. Cell Biology
  2. Developmental Biology
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Microscopy: Live imaging looks deeper

  1. Tanner C Fadero
  2. Paul S Maddox  Is a corresponding author
  1. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, United States
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Cite this article as: eLife 2017;6:e30515 doi: 10.7554/eLife.30515
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Figures

Spherical aberration causes image distortion in fluorescence microscopy.

Actual fluorescent objects (red circles) emit light (solid black lines) that is collected by the detection objective lens (dark gray trapezoid). The emitted light bends (refracts) at the boundary between the biological sample (dark blue circle) and the aqueous solution (light blue) because the refractive index (RI) is different in each material. The refraction causes the light to appear to be coming from a different location (dashed lines) than the actual object, creating an apparent image (light red oval) that is distorted. The further away from the coverslip (light gray rectangle) the object is, the more distorted its apparent image becomes. Oil (green) is used between the coverslip and the lens to obtain images with higher resolution.

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