1. Plant Biology
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Landscape genomic prediction for restoration of a Eucalyptus foundation species under climate change

  1. Megan Ann Supple  Is a corresponding author
  2. Jason G Bragg
  3. Linda M Broadhurst
  4. Adrienne B Nicotra
  5. Margaret Byrne
  6. Rose L Andrew
  7. Abigail Widdup
  8. Nicola C Aitken
  9. Justin O Borevitz
  1. The Australian National University, Australia
  2. Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation, Australia
  3. Department of Parks and Wildlife Western Australia, Australia
  4. University of New England, Australia
Research Article
  • Cited 12
  • Views 1,756
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Cite this article as: eLife 2018;7:e31835 doi: 10.7554/eLife.31835

Abstract

As species face rapid environmental change, we can build resilient populations through restoration projects that incorporate predicted future climates into seed sourcing decisions. Eucalyptus melliodora is a foundation species of a critically endangered community in Australia that is a target for restoration. We examined genomic and phenotypic variation to make empirical based recommendations for seed sourcing. We examined isolation by distance and isolation by environment, determining high levels of gene flow extending for 500 km and correlations with climate and soil variables. Growth experiments revealed extensive phenotypic variation both within and among sampling sites, but no site-specific differentiation in phenotypic plasticity. Model predictions suggest that seed can be sourced broadly across the landscape, providing ample diversity for adaptation to environmental change. Application of our landscape genomic model to E. melliodora restoration projects can identify genomic variation suitable for predicted future climates, thereby increasing the long term probability of successful restoration.

Article and author information

Author details

  1. Megan Ann Supple

    Research School of Biology, The Australian National University, Canberra, Australia
    For correspondence
    megan.a.supple@gmail.com
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0002-0204-7852
  2. Jason G Bragg

    Research School of Biology, The Australian National University, Canberra, Australia
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  3. Linda M Broadhurst

    Centre for Australian National Biodiversity Research, Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation, Canberra, Australia
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  4. Adrienne B Nicotra

    Research School of Biology, The Australian National University, Canberra, Australia
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  5. Margaret Byrne

    Science and Conservation Division, Department of Parks and Wildlife Western Australia, Perth, Australia
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0002-7197-5409
  6. Rose L Andrew

    School of Environmental and Rural Science, University of New England, Armidale, Australia
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  7. Abigail Widdup

    Research School of Biology, The Australian National University, Canberra, Australia
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  8. Nicola C Aitken

    Research School of Biology, The Australian National University, Canberra, Australia
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  9. Justin O Borevitz

    Research School of Biology, The Australian National University, Canberra, Australia
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.

Funding

Australian Research Council (Linkage Grant LP130100455)

  • Jason G Bragg
  • Linda M Broadhurst
  • Adrienne B Nicotra
  • Margaret Byrne
  • Justin O Borevitz

The funders had no role in study design, data collection and interpretation, or the decision to submit the work for publication.

Reviewing Editor

  1. Daniel J Kliebenstein, University of California, Davis, United States

Publication history

  1. Received: September 10, 2017
  2. Accepted: April 7, 2018
  3. Accepted Manuscript published: April 24, 2018 (version 1)
  4. Version of Record published: May 14, 2018 (version 2)

Copyright

© 2018, Supple et al.

This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License permitting unrestricted use and redistribution provided that the original author and source are credited.

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