Unravelling the history of hepatitis B virus genotypes A and D infection using a full-genome phylogenetic and phylogeographic approach

  1. Evangelia-Georgia Kostaki
  2. Timokratis Karamitros
  3. Garyfallia Stefanou
  4. Ioannis Mamais
  5. Konstantinos Angelis
  6. Angelos Hatzakis
  7. Anna Kramvis
  8. Dimitrios Paraskevis  Is a corresponding author
  1. National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Greece
  2. European University of Cyprus, Cyprus
  3. University of the Witwatersrand, South Africa

Abstract

Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection constitutes a global public health problem. In order to establish how HBV was disseminated across different geographic regions, we estimated the levels of regional clustering for genotypes D and A. We used 916 HBV-D and 493 HBV-A full-length sequences to reconstruct their global phylogeny. Phylogeographic analysis was conducted by reconstruction of ancestral states using the criterion of parsimony. The putative origin of genotype D was in North Africa/Middle East. HBV-D sequences form low levels of regional clustering for the Middle East and Southern Europe. In contrast, HBV-A sequences form two major clusters, the first including sequences mostly from sub-Saharan Africa, and the second including sequences mostly from Western and Central Europe. Conclusion: We observed considerable differences in the global dissemination patterns of HBV-D and HBV-A and different levels of monophyletic clustering in relation to the regions of prevalence of each genotype.

Data availability

All data (sequence alignments and additional pieces of information related to the accession numbers of sequences and their sampling areas) are available at Dryad (doi: 10.5061/dryad.bt4q242).

The following data sets were generated

Article and author information

Author details

  1. Evangelia-Georgia Kostaki

    Department of Hygiene, Epidemiology and Medical Statistics, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  2. Timokratis Karamitros

    Department of Hygiene, Epidemiology and Medical Statistics, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0003-0841-9159
  3. Garyfallia Stefanou

    Department of Hygiene, Epidemiology and Medical Statistics, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  4. Ioannis Mamais

    Department of Health Sciences, School of Sciences, European University of Cyprus, Nicosia, Cyprus
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  5. Konstantinos Angelis

    Department of Hygiene, Epidemiology and Medical Statistics, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  6. Angelos Hatzakis

    Department of Hygiene, Epidemiology and Medical Statistics, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  7. Anna Kramvis

    Hepatitis Virus Diversity Research Unit, Department of Internal Medicine, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  8. Dimitrios Paraskevis

    Department of Hygiene, Epidemiology and Medical Statistics, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece
    For correspondence
    dparask@med.uoa.gr
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0001-6167-7152

Funding

Hellenic Scientific Society for the Study of AIDS and STDs

  • Evangelia-Georgia Kostaki
  • Timokratis Karamitros
  • Garyfallia Stefanou
  • Ioannis Mamais
  • Konstantinos Angelis
  • Angelos Hatzakis
  • Anna Kramvis
  • Dimitrios Paraskevis

The funders had no role in study design, data collection and interpretation, or the decision to submit the work for publication.

Reviewing Editor

  1. Carla Osiowy, University of Manitoba, Canada

Version history

  1. Received: April 30, 2018
  2. Accepted: July 28, 2018
  3. Accepted Manuscript published: August 7, 2018 (version 1)
  4. Version of Record published: August 31, 2018 (version 2)
  5. Version of Record updated: September 5, 2018 (version 3)

Copyright

© 2018, Kostaki et al.

This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License permitting unrestricted use and redistribution provided that the original author and source are credited.

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  1. Evangelia-Georgia Kostaki
  2. Timokratis Karamitros
  3. Garyfallia Stefanou
  4. Ioannis Mamais
  5. Konstantinos Angelis
  6. Angelos Hatzakis
  7. Anna Kramvis
  8. Dimitrios Paraskevis
(2018)
Unravelling the history of hepatitis B virus genotypes A and D infection using a full-genome phylogenetic and phylogeographic approach
eLife 7:e36709.
https://doi.org/10.7554/eLife.36709

Share this article

https://doi.org/10.7554/eLife.36709

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