1. Cell Biology
  2. Microbiology and Infectious Disease
Download icon

Immunology: Identifying a nuclear passport for HIV

  1. Lorena Zuliani-Alvarez  Is a corresponding author
  2. Greg J Towers  Is a corresponding author
  1. University College London, United Kingdom
Insight
Cite this article as: eLife 2019;8:e45580 doi: 10.7554/eLife.45580
1 figure

Figures

Schematic of HIV entering the nucleus.

The genetic material of HIV is surrounded by a capsid (grey honeycomb structure). Previously, it was thought that the virus sheds this capsid before it enters the nucleus. Bejarano et al. now show that, in macrophages, the virus retains its capsid while entering the nucleus, through the nuclear pore complex (NPC; turquoise), Two proteins, CPSF6 (blue circle), and Nup153 (lilac oval) control this process. First, Nup153 binds to the capsid as it associates with the pore complex. CPSF6 then binds to the same region of the capsid, displacing the Nup153, and helping the capsid enter the nucleus. Finally, the capsid ‘uncoats’ and the viral DNA integrates into the host DNA with the help of an enzyme called integrase (green oval) and a protein called LEDGF (purple oval).

Download links

A two-part list of links to download the article, or parts of the article, in various formats.

Downloads (link to download the article as PDF)

Download citations (links to download the citations from this article in formats compatible with various reference manager tools)

Open citations (links to open the citations from this article in various online reference manager services)