1. Neuroscience
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MagC, magnetic collection of ultrathin sections for volumetric correlative light and electron microscopy

  1. Thomas Templier  Is a corresponding author
  1. University of Zurich, Switzerland
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Cite this article as: eLife 2019;8:e45696 doi: 10.7554/eLife.45696

Abstract

The non-destructive collection of ultrathin sections onto silicon wafers for post-embedding staining and volumetric correlative light and electron microscopy traditionally requires exquisite manual skills and is tedious and unreliable. In MagC introduced here, sample blocks are augmented with a magnetic resin enabling remote actuation and collection of hundreds of sections on wafer. MagC allowed the correlative visualization of neuroanatomical tracers within their ultrastructural volumetric electron microscopy context.

Article and author information

Author details

  1. Thomas Templier

    Institute of Neuroinformatics, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland
    For correspondence
    thomas.templier@epfl.ch
    Competing interests
    Thomas Templier, A patent application has been filed by ETH Zurich (EP3171150A1)..
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0002-0523-5947

Funding

ETH Zurich Foundation ETH Grant (42 15-1)

  • Thomas Templier

Innosuisse-Swiss National Foundation Bridge Proof of Concept (173825)

  • Thomas Templier

The funders had no role in study design, data collection and interpretation, or the decision to submit the work for publication.

Ethics

Animal experimentation: Animal experiments were approved by the Veterinary office of Canton Zurich (207/2013).

Reviewing Editor

  1. Moritz Helmstaedter, Max Planck Institute for Brain Research, Germany

Publication history

  1. Received: January 31, 2019
  2. Accepted: July 2, 2019
  3. Accepted Manuscript published: July 11, 2019 (version 1)
  4. Accepted Manuscript updated: July 12, 2019 (version 2)
  5. Version of Record published: August 16, 2019 (version 3)

Copyright

© 2019, Templier

This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License permitting unrestricted use and redistribution provided that the original author and source are credited.

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