1. Evolutionary Biology
  2. Genetics and Genomics
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Diverse mating phenotypes impact the spread of wtf meiotic drivers in Schizosaccharomyces pombe

  1. José Fabricio López Hernández
  2. Rachel M Helston
  3. Jeffrey J Lange
  4. R Blake Billmyre
  5. Samantha H Schaffner
  6. Michael T Eickbush
  7. Scott McCroskey
  8. Sarah E Zanders  Is a corresponding author
  1. Stowers Institute for Medical Research, United States
  2. Kenyon College, United States
Research Article
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Cite this article as: eLife 2021;10:e70812 doi: 10.7554/eLife.70812

Abstract

Meiotic drivers are genetic elements that break Mendel's law of segregation to be transmitted into more than half of the offspring produced by a heterozygote. The success of a driver relies on outcrossing (mating between individuals from distinct lineages) because drivers gain their advantage in heterozygotes. It is, therefore, curious that Schizosaccharomyces pombe, a species reported to rarely outcross, harbors many meiotic drivers. To address this paradox, we measured mating phenotypes in S. pombe natural isolates. We found that the propensity for cells from distinct clonal lineages to mate varies between natural isolates and can be affected both by cell density and by the available sexual partners. Additionally, we found that the observed levels of preferential mating between cells from the same clonal lineage can slow, but not prevent, the spread of a wtf meiotic driver in the absence of additional fitness costs linked to the driver. These analyses reveal parameters critical to understanding the evolution of S. pombe and help explain the success of meiotic drivers in this species.

Data availability

Original data underlying this manuscript can be accessed from the Stowers Original Data Repository at http://www.stowers.org/research/publications/libpbxxxx.Base called reads are available as fastq files at the SRA under project accession number PRJNA732453.

The following data sets were generated
The following previously published data sets were used

Article and author information

Author details

  1. José Fabricio López Hernández

    Stowers Institute for Medical Research, Kansas City, United States
    Competing interests
    No competing interests declared.
  2. Rachel M Helston

    Stowers Institute for Medical Research, Kansas City, United States
    Competing interests
    No competing interests declared.
  3. Jeffrey J Lange

    Stowers Institute for Medical Research, Kansas City, United States
    Competing interests
    No competing interests declared.
  4. R Blake Billmyre

    Stowers Institute for Medical Research, Kansas City, United States
    Competing interests
    No competing interests declared.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0003-4866-3711
  5. Samantha H Schaffner

    Kenyon College, Gambier, United States
    Competing interests
    No competing interests declared.
  6. Michael T Eickbush

    Stowers Institute for Medical Research, Kansas City, United States
    Competing interests
    No competing interests declared.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0001-9057-9156
  7. Scott McCroskey

    Stowers Institute for Medical Research, Kansas City, United States
    Competing interests
    No competing interests declared.
  8. Sarah E Zanders

    Stowers Institute for Medical Research, Kansas City, United States
    For correspondence
    sez@stowers.org
    Competing interests
    Sarah E Zanders, Inventor on patent application 834 serial 62/491,107 based on wtf killers..
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0003-1867-986X

Funding

Stowers Institute for Medical Research (NA)

  • Sarah E Zanders

National Institute of General Medical Sciences (DP2GM132936)

  • Sarah E Zanders

Searle Scholars Program (NA)

  • Sarah E Zanders

The funders had no role in study design, data collection and interpretation, or the decision to submit the work for publication.

Reviewing Editor

  1. Tatiana Giraud, Université Paris-Sud, France

Publication history

  1. Received: May 29, 2021
  2. Accepted: December 10, 2021
  3. Accepted Manuscript published: December 13, 2021 (version 1)

Copyright

© 2021, López Hernández et al.

This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License permitting unrestricted use and redistribution provided that the original author and source are credited.

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