Cartoon figures of various people working in research as they sit or stand on a cartoon brains with items reflecting the diversity of activities in academia. Vicky Bowskill (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0)
Edited by
Elsa Loissel et al.

Being Neurodivergent in Academia

Neurodiversity in research, from the perspective of neurodivergent scientists.
Collection
Vicky Bowskill (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0)
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Discussions around neurodiversity and neurodivergence in recent years have underscored the importance of listening to neurodivergent voices. With an emphasis on first-hand accounts, this collection provides insights into the diverse experiences of neurodivergent academics and highlights ways that research could become more neuroinclusive.

Collection

  1. A stick figure sitting on a brain on a grey-green background with white sparks

    Being Neurodivergent in Academia: The meaning of self-acceptance

    Uyen Vo
    A research technician describes how receiving an ADHD diagnosis allowed her to re-examine how she sees herself and her work.
  2. A stick figure sitting on a brain on a light green background with white sparks

    Being Neurodivergent in Academia: Nothing wrong with me

    Simone Brixius-Anderko
    An assistant professor and group leader explains how being diagnosed with autism in her early 40s changed her approach to being a scientist.
  3. A cartoonish human figure sitting on the outline of a brain on a light brown background with a bright white spark. Vicky Bowskill (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0)

    Being Neurodivergent in Academia: How to navigate fieldwork

    Hella Péter
    A PhD student recounts what she has learned from managing her ADHD between the office and the rainforest.
  4. A cartoonish human figure sitting on the outline of a brain on a warm purple background with a bright white spark. Vicky Bowskill (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0)

    Being Neurodivergent in Academia: Working with my brain and not against it

    Tigist Tamir
    When attempts to capitalize on her undiagnosed ADHD traits led to repeated cycles of overwork and burnout, a postdoc re-evaluated how she faces the daily challenges of being a neurodivergent scientist.
    1. Neuroscience

    Being Neurodivergent in Academia: Marginalising dyslexic researchers is bad for science

    Helen Taylor, Arash Zaghi, Sara Rankin
    Specific learning differences like dyslexia may play an essential role in advancing human knowledge and enriching the academic environment.
  5. Line drawing of a human figure sitting on a stylised brain, in front of white sparks on a lilac background. Vicky Bowskill (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0)

    Being Neurodivergent in Academia: Outgrowing self-denial

    Jay K Goldberg
    After hitting rock bottom a few months into a prestigious fellowship, a postdoc recounts how they found their way to ADHD medication, therapy, and better mental health.
  6. Line drawing of a human figure sitting on a stylised brain, in front of white sparks on a light blue background. Vicky Bowskill (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0)

    Being Neurodivergent in Academia: The meaning of a word

    Kirsty Lauder
    A fraught exchange on social media leads a PhD student to reconsider how she conducts research on neuroinclusivity while being neurodivergent herself.
  7. Line drawing of a human figure sitting on a stylised brain, in front of white sparks on a purple magenta background. Vicky Bowskill (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0)

    Being Neurodivergent in Academia: Autistic and abroad

    Andrew K Schulz
    An AuDHD researcher recounts the highs and lows of relocating to Germany for his postdoc.
  8. Being Neurodivergent in Academia: Your tips, tools and resources

    A crowdsourced list of practical advice on how to navigate the research environment, from and for neurodivergent scientists.
    1. Neuroscience

    Point of View: Five interdisciplinary tensions and opportunities in neurodiversity research

    Olujolagbe Layinka, Luca D Hargitai ... Florence YN Leung
    Improving our understanding of autism, ADHD, dyslexia and other neurodevelopmental conditions requires collaborations between genetics, psychiatry, the social sciences and other fields of research.
  9. Line drawing of a human figure sitting on a stylised brain, in front of white sparks on a lavender purple background. Vicky Bowskill (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0)

    Being Neurodivergent in Academia: How we stepped up to support others

    Christina Elliott, Patrick Brundell
    From diagnosis and disclosure to leading change, two neurodivergent researchers recount their experiences setting up peer support networks at their universities.
  10. Image ALT text: Line drawing of a human figure sitting on a stylised brain, in front of white sparks on a yellow background. Vicky Bowskill (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0)

    Neurodiversity in Academia: Time to rethink Tourette’s syndrome

    One is a Touretter who advocated for patients in research projects, the other, an academic studying the condition. Two sisters discuss how perspectives and research approaches on Tourette’s need to change.

Contributors

  1. Elsa Loissel
    Associate Features Editor
  2. Stuart King
    Research Culture Manager
  3. Helga Groll
    Associate Features Editor