Figure 1—figure supplement 1. | Splicing repression allows the gradual emergence of new Alu-exons in primate evolution

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Splicing repression allows the gradual emergence of new Alu-exons in primate evolution

Figure 1—figure supplement 1.

Affiliation details

UCL Institute of Neurology, United Kingdom; MRC-Laboratory of Molecular Biology, United Kingdom; Institute de Biologie de l’ENS (IBENS), CNRS UMR 8197, France; University College London Genetics Institute, United Kingdom; Goethe University Frankfurt, Germany; Institute of Molecular Biology (IMB), Germany
Figure 1—figure supplement 1.
Download figureOpen in new tabFigure 1—figure supplement 1. Alu-exon gene expression in various human tissues.

Expression levels of genes containing a cryptic, alternative or constitutive Alu-exons across a panel of human tissues. For each tissue, only expressed genes were selected (RPKM ≥ 1). Tissues are adipose, adrenal glands, brain, breast, colon, heart, kidney, liver, lung, lymph nodes, ovary, prostate, skeletal muscles, testes, thyroid to white blood cells, labelled (1) to (16).

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19545.003