Figure 4—source data 1. | Splicing repression allows the gradual emergence of new Alu-exons in primate evolution

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Splicing repression allows the gradual emergence of new Alu-exons in primate evolution

Figure 4—source data 1.

Affiliation details

UCL Institute of Neurology, United Kingdom; MRC-Laboratory of Molecular Biology, United Kingdom; Institute de Biologie de l’ENS (IBENS), CNRS UMR 8197, France; University College London Genetics Institute, United Kingdom; Goethe University Frankfurt, Germany; Institute of Molecular Biology (IMB), Germany
Figure 4—source data 1.Percent exon inclusion of Alu-exons in different human tissues.

We list percent exon inclusion for each Alu-exon with sufficient coverage across the GTEx data (889 exons with at least 4000 junction-spanning reads across 8555 individual samples). In addition, the data table includes chromosome position of the exon, mean skipping counts, the maximum and minimum inclusion across the tissues, the maximum difference in exon inclusion across the tissues, strength of the 3' splice site. In human, the length of the longest U-tract, substitutions in the Alu elements and substitution group. If no junction-reads were detected in a tissue extending from the upstream directly to the downstream exon ('skipping junctions'), we report 100% exon inclusion in this tissue.

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19545.015

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