Figure 2. | Habitat and social factors shape individual decisions and emergent group structure during baboon collective movement

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Habitat and social factors shape individual decisions and emergent group structure during baboon collective movement

Figure 2.

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Princeton University, United States; Max Planck Institute for Ornithology, Germany; University of Konstanz, Germany; University of Oxford, United Kingdom; University of California, Davis, United States; Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, Panama
Figure 2.
Download figureOpen in new tabFigure 2. Visualizing the preference landscape underlying individual movement decisions.

(A) Example of a single step taken by a focal individual. Background image shows overhead view of 3D habitat reconstruction. White marker shows the location of the focal baboon (whose next step is being modeled), and white circle shows a radius of 5 m (the specified step size) around the focal individual. White arrow shows the step actually taken by the individual. Red lines show recent locations of other baboons, and red points show locations of other baboons at the end of the step. (B –I) Visualizations of the influence of each habitat and social factor (the ‘preference landscape’) based on the fitted step selection model - lighter yellow areas represent locations that are more preferred, and darker blue areas are less preferred. Each panel represents the influence of a particular factor (ignoring all others) as predicted by the model: (B) vegetation density, (C) sleep site direction, (D) roads, (E) animal paths, (F) social density, (G) fraction of visible neighbors, (H) locations that have ever been used by another baboon, (I) number of baboons that have recently (in the past 4.5 minutes) used a location. (JL) Last three panels represent overall preference landscapes, combining information from all habitat features only (J), all social features only (K), and all features, i.e. the full model prediction (L). For another example of preference landscapes (from a case where the focal individual started on a road), see Appendix 1—figure 14.

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19505.006