eLife News

eLife News

  1. eLife appoints new Head of Technology to lead open-source tool development

    November 10, 2016

    eLife has appointed Paul Shannon as its new Head of Technology to oversee the development of tools and software in support of science communication. eLife aims to make the communication of results more beneficial for the scientific community as a whole, by operating a platform for presenting research that encourages and recognises the most responsible behaviours in science. Part of this initiative involves looking at new ways to make this content more accessible and consumable by humans and machines alike. Shannon brings approximately 13 years’ experience in technology and software...

  2. Webinar report: What’s the deal with preprints?

    November 03, 2016

    The first of our monthly #ECRwednesday webinars explored the advantages of preprints. Moderator: Emmanuelle Vire, Junior Team Leader at University College London and member of the eLife early-career advisory group. Speakers: Jessica Polka, Director of ASAPbio and visiting postdoc at Harvard Medical School; Buz Barstow, Burroughs Welcome Fund CASI Fellow at Princeton University; and Nikolai Slavov, Assistant Professor at Northeastern University. For decades researchers in physics and maths have been posting their latest research paper on a preprint server called arXiv.org at the same time as...

  3. Inside eLife: We’re inviting feedback on our waiver policy

    October 28, 2016

    eLife has announced that we’ll introduce a fee for publication of $2,500 USD effective January 1, 2017. All papers submitted from this date and accepted for publication will be subject to the fee. However, we have committed to making a fee waiver available to authors under financial constraints, as we don’t want our publication fee to impede the release of important new findings. We're aware that researchers can experience financial constraints for a number of reasons (such as career stage, available grant funding, local economy, and others) and want to understand these more clearly so we can...

  4. Job vacancy: Project Coordinator (part-time)

    October 26, 2016

    eLife is looking for a superbly organised Project Coordinator. Reporting to the Head of External Relations, the successful candidate will have primary responsibility for providing support to eLife’s marketing and communications efforts. Specific Responsibilities Coordinating events – organising eLife participation in scientific meetings and campus-level presentations around the world, including booking event space, managing registration, catering, and shipping materials. Arranging regular telephone conferences and periodic in-person meetings. Inventory and shipping – keeping an inventory of...

  5. Job vacancy: Site Reliability Engineer (DevOps, AWS, Open-source)

    October 21, 2016

    eLife are now seeking a Site Reliability Engineer to work on the automation, monitoring, architecture and testing across all of our systems. You’ll join a small and enthusiastic team who are passionate about continuous improvement and software quality. Things like TDD/BDD, continuous delivery, strong collaboration and DevOps are part of our culture. We are committed to openness both in science and in the products that we release, so that we can encourage broad change across the research communication landscape. This means everything we do becomes open-source and we specifically seek out...

  6. Job vacancy: Associate/Assistant Features Editor

    October 20, 2016

    eLife is an innovative, open-access research journal covering the life and biomedical sciences. In addition to publishing research papers, eLife also publishes magazine-style content and we are now seeking a new member of staff to help commission, edit and write this content. Overall, the mission of eLife is to help scientists accelerate discovery by operating a platform for research communication that encourages and recognises the most responsible behaviours in science. Specific Responsibilities Commissioning and editing Insight articles about selected Research Articles in eLife Writing and...

  7. Press package: How fake hand foxes brain

    October 20, 2016

    New research published in eLife reveals how the brain can be tricked into feeling disembodied from a body part and a sense ownership over a fake one. Experiments by researchers at the Universities of Turin and Milan have provided the first physiological evidence that changes to muscles and the brain help create this altered sense of self. They conducted the rubber hand illusion: subjects watch a lifelike rubber hand being touched while their own hand, hidden from view, is touched at the same time. This bizarrely leads to a sense of ownership over the rubber hand. Using magnetic fields to...

  8. Press package: Females react differently than males to social isolation

    October 11, 2016

    While male and female mice have similar responses to physical stress, research from the Hotchkiss Brain Institute at the University of Calgary, Canada, suggests females, not males, feel stressed when alone. The findings, to be published in the journal eLife, provide further proof that strategies for coping with stress are sex-specific. They also highlight the importance of a social network for females in particular and pave the way for future research into whether females befriend others as a coping mechanism during stressful situations. “Many species, including humans, use social interaction...

  9. Press package: Diabetes opens floodgates to fructose

    October 11, 2016

    Fructose, once seen as diabetics’ alternative to glucose, is fast-tracked to the liver in diabetic mice and contributes to metabolic diseases, according to new research from Harvard University. In a study to be published in eLife, scientists discovered that the effect is dependent on a protein that is turned on by diabetes and that then opens the floodgates to fructose in the small intestine. The findings are the result of both short-term and long-term feeding experiments, and they provide a vivid picture of what may be happening after consuming high-fructose food and drink. The surprise is...

  10. Press package: Overlooked plants defy drought

    October 04, 2016

    A feature thought to make plants sensitive to drought could actually hold the key to them coping with it better, according to new findings published in eLife. Plants that are resistant to the hormone abscisic acid (ABA) have until now been understood to be bad at coping with drought. However, scientists from the Carnegie Institution for Science have discovered ABA-resistant varieties that grow better than their normal neighbours when water is scarce. The new research suggests breeders should explore them for "stay green" traits. "When breeders are looking for plants able to withstand drought...

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