eLife News

eLife News

  1. Press package: Overlooked plants defy drought

    October 04, 2016

    A feature thought to make plants sensitive to drought could actually hold the key to them coping with it better, according to new findings published in eLife. Plants that are resistant to the hormone abscisic acid (ABA) have until now been understood to be bad at coping with drought. However, scientists from the Carnegie Institution for Science have discovered ABA-resistant varieties that grow better than their normal neighbours when water is scarce. The new research suggests breeders should explore them for "stay green" traits. "When breeders are looking for plants able to withstand drought...

  2. ​Inside eLife: Setting a fee for publication

    September 29, 2016

    By Mark Patterson, Executive Director ( @marknpatterson ) and Jennifer McLennan, Head of External Relations ( @jmclenna ) This month, eLife is announcing that a fee for publication of $2,500 (USD) will take effect on January 1, 2017. All papers submitted from January 1 will be subject to the fee if they are accepted for publication, although authors with insufficient funding will be eligible for a fee waiver. The publication fee is one element of eLife’s long-term financial strategy, which continues to rely on the generous support of three major biomedical research funders: the Howard Hughes...

  3. Q&A from eLife and OASPA: Early-career researcher involvement and recognition in peer review

    September 23, 2016

    In our second Q&A article to mark Peer Review Week 2016, we asked some early-career researchers about their involvement in peer review and how they feel they are recognised for their work. These responses have been provided by Sonia Sen (SS), a member of eLife’s Early Career Advisory Group and postdoctoral researcher for three years, and an early-career reviewer in the humanities at Ubiquity Press (UP) . What experience do you have as a reviewer so far? SS: I have reviewed numerous papers with my PhD mentor, and have reviewed three independently for Current Biology, PLOS Genetics and...

  4. Q&A from eLife and OASPA: Recognition and innovation in peer review

    September 22, 2016

    In the first of two Q&A articles to mark Peer Review Week 2016, we at eLife and OASPA asked two experienced reviewers and two early-career researchers for their views on recognition and innovation in peer review. The reviewers included Suzanne Pfeffer (SP), from eLife, and a contributor from Ubiquity Press (UP). Alecia Carter (AC) from eLife’s Early Career Advisory Group - a postdoctoral research fellow for over four years and semi-independent researcher for three years - and Hannes Müller Schmied (HMS) - an early-career researcher and reviewer for Copernicus Publications - also provided...

  5. Inside eLife: 500 reviews for eLife have been recorded on Publons

    September 19, 2016

    In May 2015, we started to encourage our editors and reviewers to use Publons, and there has been healthy interest in this service, with more than 500 peer reviews for eLife now recorded. Publons helps researchers receive recognition for their reviews: reviewers can list the number of reviews completed, the journals they’ve reviewed for, identify reviews for published papers, and, where permitted, upload the content of their reviews. Publons also offers reviewers the ability to transfer their peer-review contributions directly to their ORCID iD, reducing the burden of maintaining records...

  6. Recognition for Review is focus for Peer Review Week 2016

    September 19, 2016

    To honor and celebrate peer review, a group of organizations is working collaboratively to plan a week of activities and events. The group is delighted to announce that the second annual Peer Review Week will run from today, September 19, to Sunday, September 25, 2016. This year’s theme is Recognition for Review , exploring all aspects of how those participating in review activity – in publishing, grant review, conference submissions, promotion and tenure, and more – should be recognized for their contribution. Planned activities include virtual and in-person events including webinars, videos...

  7. eLife partners with Hypothes.is to advance open scholarly annotation

    September 14, 2016

    eLife, a non-profit initiative inspired by research funders and led by scientists, is working with Hypothes.is to bring publishers and researchers an open annotation platform for important online discussions. First announced in summer 2011, eLife aims to help scientists accelerate discovery by operating a platform for research collaboration that encourages and recognises the most responsible behaviours in science. Backed by the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, the Max Planck Society, and the Wellcome Trust, eLife took the first step in this initiative by launching an open-access journal for...

  8. Inside eLife: Increasing transparency in eLife’s review process

    September 01, 2016

    One of eLife’s founding principles is that “decisions about the fate of submitted papers should be fair, constructive, and provided in a timely manner” ( Launching eLife, Part 2 ), and our review process has been designed to support this. By engaging the reviewers in an open discussion, we encourage them to be constructive in their initial reviews, as they will need to be able to stand by their comments. We also publish the most substantive points from the decision letter after review, along with the reviewers’ names, where they allow. Of course, peer review in the life sciences and...

  9. Job vacancy: Innovation Officer

    August 30, 2016

    eLife is a unique collaboration between the funders and practitioners of research to improve the way important research is selected, presented, and shared. eLife publishes outstanding work across the life sciences and biomedicine, and is generously supported by its Founders who have recently announced the renewal of their funding for a second five-year term until 2022. eLife is now embarking on a new venture, the eLife Innovation Initiative, a separately funded effort within the eLife Sciences organisation aimed at accelerating the development of technology and process innovations from...

  10. Press package: Surprise discovery in the blink of an eye

    August 23, 2016

    We probably do it every day, but scientists have only just discovered a distinct new way in which we move our eyes. The team from the University of Tübingen in Germany assessed the eye movements of 11 subjects using tiny wires attached to the cornea and with infrared video tracking. In results published in eLife , they discovered a new type of eye movement that is synchronised with blinking. The movement they discovered helps to reset the eye after it twists when viewing a rotating object. It is like avoiding tiny rotations of a camera to stabilise the image we perceive. We don't notice the...

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