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  1. December 2014

    Episode 16: December 2014

    In this episode we hear about reproducibility, drug resistance, cells without walls, gene transfer, interspecies signalling, and stem cells.
  2. June 2013

    Episode 1: June 2013

    In the first eLife podcast we hear about the origins of multicellularity, the Irish potato famine, hepatitis viruses, how fog affects the behaviour of car drivers, and the evolution of chromatin.
  3. Episode 46: March 2018

    In this episode, we hear about autism, insulin resistance, Sci-Hub, coping with low levels of oxygen, and how the brain responds to blindness.
  4. A series of articles on the philosophy of biology

    Philosophy of Biology

    Curated by Helga Groll
    A series of articles offering philosophical perspectives on the life sciences.
  5. Episode 50: October 2018

    In this special episode, we discuss how tiny microbes in the gut – the microbiome – can have a huge impact on the lives of animals.
  6. August 2016

    Episode 31: August 2016

    In this episode we hear about human height, fish joints, colour vision, chimpanzees using tools and open science.
  7. April 2014

    Episode 11: April 2014

    In this episode we hear about neuropathic pain, gene therapy, insulin production, aging in worms, and how flatworms grow new body parts.
  8. A syringe injecting a clear liquid into the Earth

    Episode 56: April 2019

    In this episode, we hear about multipartite viruses, brain maps of people without hands, measles vaccinations, reproducible science, and how to spot premature babies.
    1. Neuroscience

    A quantitative theory of gamma synchronization in macaque V1

    Eric Lowet et al.
    Gamma-band synchronization behavior in area V1 was predicted by weakly coupled oscillator principles.
    1. Neuroscience

    Bmal1 function in skeletal muscle regulates sleep

    J Christopher Ehlen et al.
    Expression of transcription factor BMAL1 in skeletal muscle reduces the recovery response to sleep loss and is both necessary and sufficient to regulate total sleep amount.