23 results found
    1. Neuroscience

    The Ionotropic Receptors IR21a and IR25a mediate cool sensing in Drosophila

    Lina Ni et al.
    Two members of a widely studied family of chemoreceptors, the "orphan" chemoreceptor IR21a and its putative co-receptor IR25a, act together to mediate cool sensation in fruit fly larvae.
    1. Neuroscience

    Distinct combinations of variant ionotropic glutamate receptors mediate thermosensation and hygrosensation in Drosophila

    Zachary A Knecht et al.
    A combination of genetics, behavior and physiology demonstrate that cool and moisture sensing rely on overlapping combinations of sensory receptors in Drosophila.
    1. Neuroscience

    Ionotropic Receptor-dependent moist and dry cells control hygrosensation in Drosophila

    Zachary A Knecht et al.
    The neurons and receptors mediating moist air detection in Drosophila are identified, revealing that moist and dry air detection depend on overlapping Ionotropic Receptors and that these pathways are both critical for hygrosensation.
    1. Neuroscience

    Molecular basis of fatty acid taste in Drosophila

    Ji-Eun Ahn et al.
    Molecular-genetic, neural imaging and behavioral analyses reveal how Drosophila melanogaster sense fatty acids, important nutrient compounds, through multimeric Ionoptropic Receptors complexes.
    1. Neuroscience

    Ir56d-dependent fatty acid responses in Drosophila uncover taste discrimination between different classes of fatty acids

    Elizabeth B Brown et al.
    The taste system of fruit flies is activated by broad classes of fatty acids and can discriminate between different classes, revealing previously underappreciated complexity in the coding of tastants.
    1. Neuroscience

    Internal amino acid state modulates yeast taste neurons to support protein homeostasis in Drosophila

    Kathrin Steck et al.
    Two different classes of taste receptor neurons in the Drosophila melanogaster proboscis play distinct roles in yeast feeding and are both modulated by the fly's internal amino acid state in order to promote protein-specific appetite.
    1. Neuroscience

    Acetic acid activates distinct taste pathways in Drosophila to elicit opposing, state-dependent feeding responses

    Anita V Devineni et al.
    A single taste input, acetic acid, elicits opposing behavioral outputs depending on a fly's hunger state.
    1. Developmental Biology
    2. Neuroscience

    Targeted molecular profiling of rare olfactory sensory neurons identifies fate, wiring, and functional determinants

    J Roman Arguello et al.
    Targeted expression of molecular probes for gene expression and chromatin accessibility in subpopulations of neurons in the Drosophila olfactory system identifies genes required for their development and function.
    1. Neuroscience

    A complex peripheral code for salt taste in Drosophila

    Alexandria H Jaeger et al.
    Unlike other taste modalities, the Drosophila taste system encodes salt taste combinatorially across multiple sensory neuron classes, which combine to produce behavioural valence and plasticity.
    1. Neuroscience

    Humidity response depends on the small soluble protein Obp59a in Drosophila

    Jennifer S Sun et al.
    Hygroreception, a poorly understood process critical to insect survival, depends on a small protein in the antenna of the fruit fly that was previously thought to transport odorants.

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