135 results found
    1. Cancer Biology

    Replication Study: Intestinal inflammation targets cancer-inducing activity of the microbiota

    Kathryn Eaton et al.
    Editors' Summary: This Replication Study has reproduced some parts of the original paper but it also contains results that are not consistent with other parts of the original paper.
    1. Immunology and Inflammation

    The autophagy gene Atg16l1 differentially regulates Treg and TH2 cells to control intestinal inflammation

    Agnieszka M Kabat et al.
    Impaired autophagy influences intestinal inflammation and hypersensitivity responses by orchestrating mucosal T cell populations, suggesting new translational perspectives for the treatment of these conditions.
    1. Immunology and Inflammation

    ILC3 GM-CSF production and mobilisation orchestrate acute intestinal inflammation

    Claire Pearson et al.
    Innate lymphoid cells, which are dynamic under steady-state conditions, respond to a colitogenic stimulus by mobilizing from cryptopatches and secreting GM-CSF to organize the pro-inflammatory response.
    1. Immunology and Inflammation

    Macrophage dysfunction initiates colitis during weaning of infant mice lacking the interleukin-10 receptor

    Naresh S Redhu et al.
    A detailed time-series analysis reveals that the interleukin-10 receptor prevents susceptibility to microbiota-driven colonic inflammation that emerges at the time of weaning by directly inhibiting the acquisition of a pro-inflammatory intestinal macrophage phenotype.
    1. Structural Biology and Molecular Biophysics
    2. Immunology and Inflammation

    Immune Response: An ambulance for retinol

    Stephanie C Ganal, Andrew J MacPherson
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    1. Human Biology and Medicine
    2. Neuroscience

    Point of View: Predictive regulation and human design

    Peter Sterling
    Why does the human regulatory system, which evolution tuned for small satisfactions, now constantly demand 'more'?
    1. Computational and Systems Biology
    2. Microbiology and Infectious Disease

    Microbiome: Does disease start in the mouth, the gut or both?

    Andrei Prodan et al.
    Oral bacteria colonize the gut more frequently than previously thought.
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    1. Developmental Biology
    2. Microbiology and Infectious Disease

    Bacterial colonization stimulates a complex physiological response in the immature human intestinal epithelium

    David R Hill et al.
    Contact with bacteria and subsequent hypoxia promotes functional maturation of the immature gastrointestinal tract.

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