483 results found
    1. Developmental Biology

    Tip cell-specific requirement for an atypical Gpr124- and Reck-dependent Wnt/β-catenin pathway during brain angiogenesis

    Benoit Vanhollebeke et al.
    The membrane proteins Reck and Gpr124 are integral components of a novel Wnt7a/Wnt7b-specific signaling complex, and there is a distinctive requirement for Wnt/β-catenin signaling in tip cells during angiogenesis in the central nervous system.
    1. Structural Biology and Molecular Biophysics

    Structural basis for DNA 5´-end resection by RecJ

    Kaiying Cheng et al.
    A structural investigation reveals details of the mechanism by which the nuclease RecJ processes DNA ends to repair double strand breaks.
  1. Research: Publication bias and the canonization of false facts

    Silas Boye Nissen et al.
    Publication bias, in which positive results are preferentially reported by authors and published by journals, can restrict the visibility of evidence against false claims and allow such claims to be canonized inappropriately as facts.
    1. Cell Biology
    2. Chromosomes and Gene Expression

    Chromosome Segregation: Freewheeling sisters cause problems

    Takashi Akera, Michael A Lampson
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    1. Ecology

    Mass Spawning: Sex under the moon

    Didier Zoccola, Sylvie Tambutté
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    1. Cell Biology
    2. Developmental Biology

    Mitochondrial fusion is required for spermatogonial differentiation and meiosis

    Grigor Varuzhanyan et al.
    Mitochondrial fusion enables a metabolic transition during spermatogenesis.
    1. Cell Biology
    2. Physics of Living Systems

    Metabolic constraints drive self-organization of specialized cell groups

    Sriram Varahan et al.
    In a developing yeast colony, cells go from homogeneous states to spatially organized, specialized metabolic states, and the new metabolic states depend on resources produced by the original state.
    1. Cell Biology

    The transcription factor Hey and nuclear lamins specify and maintain cell identity

    Naama Flint Brodsly et al.
    Hey together with LaminC continuously supervise nuclear organisation and differentiated enterocyte identity, a regulation that is lost upon ageing, resulting in loss of gut homeostasis.

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