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    1. Human Biology and Medicine
    2. Neuroscience

    Alcoholism gender differences in brain responsivity to emotional stimuli

    Kayle S Sawyer et al.
    Neuroimaging shows brain responses to emotional pictures are more diminished in alcoholic men than in alcoholic women, implicating gender-related mechanisms of addiction.
    1. Chromosomes and Gene Expression
    2. Genetics and Genomics

    The genetic architecture of NAFLD among inbred strains of mice

    Simon T Hui et al.
    A system genetics approach reveals a unique molecular signature of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in mice and identifies novel genetic factors affecting hepatic steatosis.
    1. Developmental Biology
    2. Human Biology and Medicine

    Contraception: Stopping sperm in their tracks

    Luke L McGoldrick, Jean-Ju Chung
    An automated high-throughput platform can screen for molecules that change the motility of sperm cells and their ability to fertilize.
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  1. Cutting Edge: A network approach to mixing delegates at meetings

    Federico Vaggi et al.
    A network-based ‘speed dating’ approach can promote interactions between delegates at scientific meetings.
    1. Neuroscience

    Social Neuroscience: How does social enrichment produce health benefits?

    Takefumi Kikusui
    Oxytocin appears to link social interaction and cell aging in rats, especially in females.
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    1. Human Biology and Medicine
    2. Neuroscience

    Point of View: Predictive regulation and human design

    Peter Sterling
    Why does the human regulatory system, which evolution tuned for small satisfactions, now constantly demand 'more'?
    1. Ecology
    2. Genetics and Genomics

    The Natural History of Model Organisms: The fascinating and secret wild life of the budding yeast S. cerevisiae

    Gianni Liti
    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has informed our understanding of molecular biology and genetics for decades, and learning more about its natural history could fuel a new era of functional and evolutionary studies of this classic model organism.