168 results found
    1. Cancer Biology
    2. Developmental Biology

    The antimicrobial peptide defensin cooperates with tumour necrosis factor to drive tumour cell death in Drosophila

    Jean-Philippe Parvy et al.
    Natural activity of the antimicrobial peptide Defensin includes execution of tumour cell death by tumour necrosis factor in Drosophila.
    1. Microbiology and Infectious Disease

    Density-dependent resistance protects Legionella pneumophila from its own antimicrobial metabolite, HGA

    Tera C Levin et al.
    Legionella pneumophila can be inhibited by its own antimicrobial, HGA (homogentisic acid), but its density-dependent resistance to HGA restricts the potential for self-harm.
    1. Computational and Systems Biology
    2. Microbiology and Infectious Disease

    Heterogeneous absorption of antimicrobial peptide LL37 in Escherichia coli cells enhances population survivability

    Mehdi Snoussi et al.
    A rapid absorption and retention of antimicrobial peptides by dead Escherichia coli cells can increase the survivability of the cell population in a "cooperative" fashion.
    1. Immunology and Inflammation

    Synergy and remarkable specificity of antimicrobial peptides in vivo using a systematic knockout approach

    Mark Austin Hanson et al.
    While antimicrobial cocktails are highly effective for defence against pathogenic microbes, the innate immune response may instead employ highly specific peptidic antibiotics to combat certain natural enemies.
    1. Epidemiology and Global Health
    2. Microbiology and Infectious Disease

    Fitness benefits in fluoroquinolone-resistant Salmonella Typhi in the absence of antimicrobial pressure

    Stephen Baker et al.
    The major evolutionary routes to drug resistance in Salmonella Typhi are associated with fitness benefits, not fitness costs, implying that prudent antimicrobial use will have no effect as a public health intervention in controlling typhoid fever.
    1. Evolutionary Biology
    2. Microbiology and Infectious Disease

    Bacterial Evolution: The road to resistance

    Devon M Fitzgerald
    The way that bacteria grow—either floating in liquid or attached to a surface—affects their ability to evolve antimicrobial resistance and our ability to treat infections.
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    1. Epidemiology and Global Health
    2. Microbiology and Infectious Disease

    Resistome diversity in cattle and the environment decreases during beef production

    Noelle R Noyes et al.
    Interventions in feedlots and abattoirs place selective pressure on the beef cattle resistome, which differentially impacts the public health risk of antimicrobial resistance from beef production sources.
    1. Ecology
    2. Evolutionary Biology

    Nitric oxide radicals are emitted by wasp eggs to kill mold fungi

    Erhard Strohm et al.
    To protect their food and themselves against detrimental mould fungi, the eggs of a wasp species synthesize and emit remarkable amounts of gaseous nitrogen oxides that are highly effective antimicrobials.
    1. Evolutionary Biology
    2. Microbiology and Infectious Disease

    Evolutionary pathways to antibiotic resistance are dependent upon environmental structure and bacterial lifestyle

    Alfonso Santos-Lopez et al.
    Bacteria growing in biofilms evolve antimicrobial resistance via different pathways and generate greater genetic diversity than well-mixed populations, selecting fitter but less resistant genotypes.

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