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  1. Science Writing Competition: Hip, hip, hooray!

    Emma Pewsey
    The use of X-rays to investigate why bones break could lead to treatments that reduce the number of elderly people who suffer broken hips.
    1. Cell Biology
    2. Computational and Systems Biology

    Science Forum: The Human Cell Atlas

    Aviv Regev et al.
    Advances in techniques for analysing single cells and tissues have inspired an international effort to create comprehensive reference maps of all human cells - the fundamental units of life - as a basis for both understanding human health and diagnosing, monitoring and treating disease.
    1. Ecology
    2. Human Biology and Medicine

    Point of View: A transatlantic perspective on 20 emerging issues in biological engineering

    Bonnie C Wintle et al.
    Horizon scanning has been used to identify opportunities and risks presented by 20 emerging issues in the field of biological engineering.
    1. Developmental Biology

    Developmental Biology: Shaping the sound of voice

    Ralph Marcucio
    The proper development of the vocal cords requires embryos to contain a certain number of progenitor cells, and mutations that lead to an overflow of cells can cause malformations of the voice box.
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    1. Neuroscience

    Echolocation: Smart bats click twice

    Manfred Kössl, Julio Hechavarría
    The acoustic representation of the outside world in the midbrain of a bat becomes more precise as it uses double clicks to locate closer objects.
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    1. Neuroscience

    Urodynamics: How the brain controls urination

    Anna P Malykhina
    Coordination between the brainstem and the cortex helps to ensure that urination occurs at an appropriate time.
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    1. Neuroscience

    Developmental Neuroscience: Catching a wave

    P Michelle Fogerson, John R Huguenard
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    1. Neuroscience

    Rotating waves during human sleep spindles organize global patterns of activity that repeat precisely through the night

    Lyle Muller et al.
    A phase-based analysis reveals wave-like spatiotemporal organization of the human sleep spindle, a brain oscillation critical to sleep-dependent memory consolidation, and elucidates its role in coordinating activity of neural networks distributed across the cortex.
    1. Human Biology and Medicine
    2. Neuroscience

    Neuroscience: Awakened by a sleeping pill

    Oluwaseun Akeju, Emery N Brown
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    1. Neuroscience

    Different types of theta rhythmicity are induced by social and fearful stimuli in a network associated with social memory

    Alex Tendler, Shlomo Wagner
    Variations in the frequency of theta brain waves enable a single network of brain regions to generate appropriate responses to stimuli with different kinds of emotional value.