1,071 results found
    1. Biophysics and Structural Biology

    Phosphoinositide-mediated oligomerization of a defensin induces cell lysis

    Ivan KH Poon et al.
    A novel innate defense mechanism of cell lysis involves the coordinated oligomerization of a defensin by interaction with the membrane lipid, phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate.
    1. Microbiology and Infectious Disease

    Kin cell lysis is a danger signal that activates antibacterial pathways of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Michele LeRoux et al.
    The death of bacterial kin cells releases a danger signal that activates a posttranscriptional response in surviving cells, resulting in the rapid elaboration of interbacterial competition factors.
    1. Microbiology and Infectious Disease

    Impaired respiration elicits SrrAB-dependent programmed cell lysis and biofilm formation in Staphylococcus aureus

    Ameya A Mashruwala et al.
    The absence of oxygen prompts Staphylococcus aureus cells to rupture resulting in increased formation of biofilms, which are the etiological agents of recurrent infections.
    1. Microbiology and Infectious Disease

    Biofilms: Take my breath away

    Vinai C Thomas, Paul D Fey
    A lack of oxygen activates a pathway that causes the bacterial cell wall to break down, which, in turn, aids bacterial biofilm development.
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    1. Biochemistry
    2. Biophysics and Structural Biology

    Antimicrobials: A lysin to kill

    Anthony O Gaca, Michael S Gilmore
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    1. Genomics and Evolutionary Biology

    Horizontal Gene Transfer: Antibiotic genes spread far and wide

    Ryan J Catchpole, Anthony M Poole
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    1. Cancer Biology

    Mice deficient of Myc super-enhancer region reveal differential control mechanism between normal and pathological growth

    Kashyap Dave et al.
    A tumor-specific regulatory region has been identified upstream of the Myc oncogene.
    1. Biochemistry
    2. Cell Biology

    Efficient protein targeting to the inner nuclear membrane requires Atlastin-dependent maintenance of ER topology

    Sumit Pawar et al.
    Efficient targeting of membrane proteins from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to the inner nuclear membrane depends on GTP hydrolysis by Atlastin GTPases and their function in maintaining an interconnected topology of the ER network.

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