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    1. Neuroscience

    A role for cerebellum in the hereditary dystonia DYT1

    Rachel Fremont et al.
    The most common inherited dystonia, DYT1, is likely caused primarily by the dysfunction of the cerebellum rather than the basal ganglia.
    1. Developmental Biology
    2. Neuroscience

    Phenotypic outcomes in Mouse and Human Foxc1 dependent Dandy-Walker cerebellar malformation suggest shared mechanisms

    Parthiv Haldipur et al.
    Building on previous work (Haldipur et al., 2014), we show that many key mechanisms controlling cerebellar development are likely conserved between mouse and human, and validate our mouse model of Dandy-Walker malformation.
    1. Neuroscience

    Sex differences in cerebellar synaptic transmission and sex-specific responses to autism-linked Gabrb3 mutations in mice

    Audrey A Mercer et al.
    Male and female mice differ in basal cerebellar physiology, including the magnitude of synaptic excitation by metabotropic glutamate receptors, kinetics of synaptic inhibition, intrinsic properties, and responses to autism-linked mutations.
    1. Neuroscience

    Gradients in the mammalian cerebellar cortex enable Fourier-like transformation and improve storing capacity

    Isabelle Straub et al.
    Electrophysiological and computational approaches show that superficial and deep cerebellar granule cells preferentially fire during low- and high-frequency inputs, respectively, enabling a Fourier-like transformation in the granule cell layer.
    1. Neuroscience

    Classical conditioning drives learned reward prediction signals in climbing fibers across the lateral cerebellum

    William Heffley, Court Hull
    Cerebellar climbing fibers can generate learned reward-predictive instructional signals, suggesting a role for cerebellar learning in the reinforcement of reward-driven behaviors.
    1. Neuroscience

    Complex spike synchrony dependent modulation of rat deep cerebellar nuclear activity

    Tianyu Tang et al.
    The importance of synchronous Purkinje cell complex spikes for controlling cerebellar output was investigated by simultaneously recording from cerebellar nuclear cells and arrays of Purkinje cells that synapse onto them.
    1. Neuroscience

    Different contributions of preparatory activity in the basal ganglia and cerebellum for self-timing

    Jun Kunimatsu et al.
    Neuronal activity in the striatum keeps track of elapsed time during the time production task while that in the cerebellum correlates with stochastic variation of self-timing in the range of several hundreds of milliseconds.
    1. Neuroscience

    Cerebellar involvement in an evidence-accumulation decision-making task

    Ben Deverett et al.
    In a new evidence-accumulation decision-making task, activity of the lateral posterior cerebellum is necessary for accurate performance, and somatic and dendritic activity in Purkinje cells contains choice/evidence and error-related information.
    1. Neuroscience

    Control of voluntary and optogenetically perturbed locomotion by spike rate and timing of neurons of the mouse cerebellar nuclei

    Rashmi Sarnaik, Indira M Raman
    Stride-related modulated firing by neurons of the cerebellar nuclei is required for smooth execution of practiced locomotion and persists more easily with synchronous than asynchronous Purkinje-mediated inhibition.
    1. Developmental Biology
    2. Neuroscience

    Analogous mechanism regulating formation of neocortical basal radial glia and cerebellar Bergmann glia

    Xin Heng et al.
    Genome-wide transcriptional profiling and genetic analyses reveal conserved mechanisms underlying the generation of neocortical basal radial glia and cerebellar Bergmann glia.