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    1. Ecology
    2. Evolutionary Biology

    The African ape-like foot of Ardipithecus ramidus and its implications for the origin of bipedalism

    Thomas Cody Prang
    The most recent common ancestor of humans, chimpanzees, and bonobos possessed a foot adapted to terrestrial quadrupedalism and climbing.
    1. Neuroscience

    Human Intelligence: What single neurons can tell us

    Elaine N Miller, Chet C Sherwood
    IQ scores are correlated with the morphology and activity of certain neurons in the human temporal cortex.
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    1. Evolutionary Biology
    Neighboring communities of bonobos hunt different prey species

    Social Learning: Does culture shape hunting behavior in bonobos?

    Andrew Whiten
    New evidence that neighboring communities of bonobos hunt different prey species, despite extensive overlaps in where they live and hunt, is difficult to explain without invoking cultural factors.
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    1. Neuroscience

    Point of View: Predictive regulation and human design

    Peter Sterling
    Why does the human regulatory system, which evolution tuned for small satisfactions, now constantly demand 'more'?
    1. Evolutionary Biology

    Paleontology: These feet were made for walking

    William L Jungers
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    1. Ecology
    2. Neuroscience

    Communication: Listening in

    Erich D Jarvis
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    1. Ecology

    Stone Tool Use: Monkeys overharvest shellfish

    George H Perry, Brian F Codding
    The use of stone tools by macaques in Thailand has reduced the size and population density of coastal shellfish; previously it was thought that tool-assisted overharvesting effects resulted uniquely from human activity.
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    1. Evolutionary Biology

    Evolution: Mapping the ancestry of primates

    Ignacio Martínez, Mercedes Conde-Valverde
    Structures in the inner ear can help determine the evolutionary relationship between extinct and living primates.
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