103 results found
    1. Ecology
    2. Neuroscience

    Select forelimb muscles have evolved superfast contractile speed to support acrobatic social displays

    Matthew J Fuxjager et al.
    In situ measurements of muscular twitch speed reveal one of the fastest vertebrate limb muscles on record, which evolved in association with extravagant courtship displays that include rapid limb movements.
    1. Neuroscience

    Female mice ultrasonically interact with males during courtship displays

    Joshua P Neunuebel et al.
    A microphone array enables the vocal contribution of each socially interacting individual to be quantified, and reveals that vocalizations are exchanged between the sexes during mouse courtship.
    1. Evolutionary Biology
    2. Neuroscience

    Divergent sensory investment mirrors potential speciation via niche partitioning across Drosophila

    Ian W Keesey et al.
    Phototaxis and courtship behavioral preferences reflect strong correlation with differences in olfactory and visual nervous system investment across five monophyletic Drosophila species, and could help explain their speciation events.
    1. Evolutionary Biology
    2. Neuroscience

    Physiological constraint on acrobatic courtship behavior underlies rapid sympatric speciation in bearded manakins

    Meredith C Miles et al.
    Skeletal muscle performance sets the course of rapid speciation by defining the evolutionary trajectory of reproductive behavior.
    1. Neuroscience

    Neuropeptide B mediates female sexual receptivity in medaka fish, acting in a female-specific but reversible manner

    Towako Hiraki-Kajiyama et al.
    In the brain of medaka fish, neuropeptide B acts directly downstream of estrogen in a female-specific but reversible manner to mediate female receptivity to male courtship.
    1. Genetics and Genomics
    2. Neuroscience

    Fruitless mutant male mosquitoes gain attraction to human odor

    Nipun S Basrur et al.
    Engineering male mosquitoes lacking the fruitless gene induces them to be attracted to humans.
    1. Genetics and Genomics
    2. Neuroscience

    Sex-determining genes distinctly regulate courtship capability and target preference via sexually dimorphic neurons

    Kenichi Ishii et al.
    Sex-specific characteristics of the fruit fly courtship behavior are not specified by a single binary switch, but as a combination of traits that are modularly specified by separable genetic switches.
    1. Neuroscience

    P1 interneurons promote a persistent internal state that enhances inter-male aggression in Drosophila

    Eric D Hoopfer et al.
    A sexually dimorphic circuit node controls a persistent, internal state that promotes fighting and mating in Drosophila, revealing parallels with mammalian systems suggestive of a conserved circuit "motif" controlling social behaviors.
    1. Neuroscience

    Acoustic duetting in Drosophila virilis relies on the integration of auditory and tactile signals

    Kelly M LaRue et al.
    Quantitative behavioral assays and modeling show that acoustic duetting in Drosophila during courtship relies on the detection of precisely timed cues via multiple sensory channels.
    1. Neuroscience

    Excitation and inhibition onto central courtship neurons biases Drosophila mate choice

    Benjamin R Kallman et al.
    Pheromones activate excitatory and inhibitory pathways that are integrated to guide mating decisions in Drosophila melanogaster.

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