731 results found
    1. Neuroscience

    Recruitment of the default mode network during a demanding act of executive control

    Ben M Crittenden et al.
    The default mode network in the brain is activated during the performance of executive-type tasks when a substantial change in cognitive contents is required.
    1. Neuroscience

    Content-specific activity in frontoparietal and default-mode networks during prior-guided visual perception

    Carlos González-García et al.
    Prior experience alters content-specific neural representations of visual input in frontoparietal and default-mode networks.
    1. Neuroscience

    Processing of different spatial scales in the human brain

    Michael Peer et al.
    When subjects perform spatial judgments in environments of increasing scale, brain activity shifts along posterior-anterior gradients, advancing from the visual system to the default-mode network.
    1. Neuroscience

    Disruption of thalamic functional connectivity is a neural correlate of dexmedetomidine-induced unconsciousness

    Oluwaseun Akeju et al.
    Patterns of communication between the thalamus and the cortex are correlated with anesthesia-induced loss of consciousness and recovery.
    1. Neuroscience

    Functional gradients of the cerebellum

    Xavier Guell et al.
    Cerebellar functional regions follow a gradual organization, which progresses from primary (motor) to transmodal (Default Mode Network) regions, and a secondary axis extends from task-unfocused to task-focused processing.
    1. Neuroscience

    Task-induced functional brain connectivity mediates the relationship between striatal D2/3 receptors and working memory

    Matthew M Nour et al.
    Striatal dopamine 2/3 receptor (D2/3R) availability is related to working memory-induced functional connectivity changes in the default mode network, and this mediates the relationship between D2/3Rs and task performance.
    1. Neuroscience

    Spatial Navigation: A question of scale

    Muireann Irish, Siddharth Ramanan
    An fMRI experiment reveals distinct brain regions that respond in a graded manner as humans process distance information across increasing spatial scales.
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  1. Point of View: Overflow in science and its implications for trust

    Sabina Siebert et al.
    Interviews with senior biomedical researchers reveal a perceived decline in trust in the scientific enterprise, in large part because the quantity of new data exceeds the field's ability to process it appropriately.
  2. Research: Sci-Hub provides access to nearly all scholarly literature

    Daniel S Himmelstein et al.
    The availability of almost all articles from toll access journals in the Sci-Hub repository will disrupt scholarly publishing towards more open models.

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