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    1. Neuroscience

    Two opposite voltage-dependent currents control the unusual early development pattern of embryonic Renshaw cell electrical activity

    Juliette Boeri et al.
    A simple mechanism, based on the synergy of two major opposing voltage-dependent currents that are ubiquitous in neurons, produces functional diversity of developing Renshaw cells in the embryo.
    1. Chromosomes and Gene Expression
    2. Genetics and Genomics

    Dynamics of genomic innovation in the unicellular ancestry of animals

    Xavier Grau-Bové et al.
    The foundations of genomic complexity in multicellular animals have deep roots in their unicellular prehistory, both in terms of innovations in gene content, as well as the evolutionary dynamics of genome architecture.
    1. Immunology and Inflammation

    Ageing compromises mouse thymus function and remodels epithelial cell differentiation

    Jeanette Baran-Gale et al.
    Thymus ageing is characterised by both compositional and transcriptional shifts amongst epithelial cells that perturb their differentiation, contribute to organ atrophy and ultimately impair immune function.
    1. Ecology

    Group-specific archaeological signatures of stone tool use in wild macaques

    Lydia V Luncz et al.
    Tool behaviour of long-tailed macaques leaves archaeological signatures that differ between populations despite similar ecological conditions, highlighting the potential for diversity in material culture.
    1. Ecology
    2. Evolutionary Biology

    Social groups buffer maternal loss in mountain gorillas

    Robin E Morrison et al.
    In mountain gorillas, as in certain human populations, relationships between group members can act as a social buffer, breaking the link between maternal loss, increased social adversity, and decreased fitness.
    1. Ecology
    2. Evolutionary Biology

    Why is cyclic dominance so rare?

    Hye Jin Park et al.
    A mathematical model for a popular biological diversity mechanism, cyclic dominance, is more likely to emerge by assembly than by evolutionary diversification, which rationalizes why few empirically studies find it.
    1. Ecology
    2. Epidemiology and Global Health

    Tracking zoonotic pathogens using blood-sucking flies as 'flying syringes'

    Paul-Yannick Bitome-Essono et al.
    A field study coupled with a molecular analysis demonstrates that using hematophagous flies as 'flying syringes' could be used to investigate blood-borne pathogen diversity in wild vertebrates and act as an early detection tool of zoonotic pathogens.
  1. Research Culture: Career choices of underrepresented and female postdocs in the biomedical sciences

    W Marcus Lambert et al.
    Mentorship, financial security and a positive sense of self-worth increase the likelihood that underrepresented minority and female postdocs will pursue a career in academia.
    1. Genetics and Genomics

    The rise and fall of the Phytophthora infestans lineage that triggered the Irish potato famine

    Kentaro Yoshida et al.
    The strain of Phytophthora infestans that caused the Great Famine in the late 1840s was caused by a single genotype that is distinct from, but closely related to, the most prevalent modern genotype.
    1. Developmental Biology
    2. Genetics and Genomics

    The genome sequence of the colonial chordate, Botryllus schlosseri

    Ayelet Voskoboynik et al.
    The Botryllus schlosseri genome yields insights into the evolution of hematopoiesis.