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    1. Structural Biology and Molecular Biophysics

    Ion Channels: Poring over furrows

    Skylar ID Fisher, H Criss Hartzell
    Cryo-electron microscopy reveals the structure of a chloride channel that is closely related to a protein that transports lipids.
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    1. Biochemistry and Chemical Biology
    2. Structural Biology and Molecular Biophysics

    Structural basis of transcription arrest by coliphage HK022 Nun in an Escherichia coli RNA polymerase elongation complex

    Jin Young Kang et al.
    Cryo-electron microscopy structures show how coliphage HK022 Nun blocks Escherichia coli RNA polymerase translocation by mediating multiple interactions between the RNA polymerase and nucleic acids.
    1. Cell Biology

    Actin assembly ruptures the nuclear envelope by prying the lamina away from nuclear pores and nuclear membranes in starfish oocytes

    Natalia Wesolowska et al.
    Combined light and electron microscopy reveals a new function for Arp2/3-mediated actin assembly in nuclear envelope rupture, which leads to a separation of nuclear membranes and pores from the lamina.
    1. Biochemistry and Chemical Biology
    2. Structural Biology and Molecular Biophysics

    E. coli TraR allosterically regulates transcription initiation by altering RNA polymerase conformation

    James Chen et al.
    Cryo-electron microscopy structures, combined with biochemical experiments, show how the E. coli F element-encoded TraR protein regulates transcription initiation by altering RNA polymerase conformation and conformational heterogeneity.
    1. Human Biology and Medicine
    2. Microbiology and Infectious Disease

    Mechanisms of virus dissemination in bone marrow of HIV-1–infected humanized BLT mice

    Mark S Ladinsky et al.
    Large-volume light microscopy combined with higher-resolution electron tomography revealed the spatial distribution of virus-producing cells and highlighted mechanisms of HIV-1 dissemination in bone marrow from a small animal model.
    1. Cell Biology

    Recruitment dynamics of ESCRT-III and Vps4 to endosomes and implications for reverse membrane budding

    Manuel Alonso Y Adell et al.
    Quantitative 3D lattice light sheet microscopy of unperturbed cells combined with electron tomography and acute loss of function experiments reveals how dynamic ESCRT-III/Vps4 assemblies succeed in reverse membrane budding on endosomes.
    1. Structural Biology and Molecular Biophysics
    2. Microbiology and Infectious Disease

    Competing scaffolding proteins determine capsid size during mobilization of Staphylococcus aureus pathogenicity islands

    Altaira D Dearborn et al.
    Cryo-electron microscopy and genetics show how Staphylococcus aureus pathogenicity island 1 hijacks the assembly pathway of a helper phage for its own propagation.
    1. Structural Biology and Molecular Biophysics

    Conserved mechanisms of microtubule-stimulated ADP release, ATP binding, and force generation in transport kinesins

    Joseph Atherton et al.
    Cryo-electron microscopy reconstructions of two microtubule-bound transport kinesins at 7 Å resolution reveal how microtubule track binding stimulates ADP release, primes the active site for ATP binding and enables force generation.
    1. Biochemistry and Chemical Biology
    2. Structural Biology and Molecular Biophysics

    3.3-Å resolution cryo-EM structure of human ribonucleotide reductase with substrate and allosteric regulators bound

    Edward J Brignole et al.
    Cryo-electron microscopy structures of human ribonucleotide reductase reveal molecular details of substrate selection and allosteric inhibition through assembly of its large subunit into a ring that excludes its small subunit.
    1. Neuroscience

    SynEM, automated synapse detection for connectomics

    Benedikt Staffler et al.
    The detection of chemical synapses in 3-dimensional electron microscopy data has been automated such that synapses in large-scale connectivity maps of the cerebral cortex, connectomes, can be charted without the need for human interaction.