1,663 results found
    1. Neuroscience

    Mesolimbic confidence signals guide perceptual learning in the absence of external feedback

    Matthias Guggenmos et al.
    Neural confidence signals can take the role of reward signals and explain perceptual learning without external feedback as a form of internal reinforcement learning.
    1. Neuroscience

    Dynamic representation of partially occluded objects in primate prefrontal and visual cortex

    Amber M Fyall et al.
    Complementary neural codes in frontal and visual cortex support a role for feedback signals in the representation and recognition of partially occluded objects.
    1. Computational and Systems Biology
    2. Neuroscience

    Statistical context dictates the relationship between feedback-related EEG signals and learning

    Matthew R Nassar et al.
    The P300, an electroencephalography (EEG) component known to be evoked by surprising events, predicts learning in a bidirectional manner that depends critically on the surrounding statistical context.
    1. Computational and Systems Biology
    2. Immunology and Inflammation

    IFN-mediated negative feedback supports bacteria class-specific macrophage inflammatory responses

    Rachel A Gottschalk et al.
    Inflammatory dynamics are tailored to bacterial class through macrophage integration of microbial stimuli and cytokine feedback.
    1. Neuroscience

    The inhibitory microcircuit of the substantia nigra provides feedback gain control of the basal ganglia output

    Jennifer Brown et al.
    Negative feedback signals within the substantia nigra regulate the output of the basal ganglia, with implications for disorders such as Parkinson's disease.
    1. Neuroscience

    Cerebellar implementation of movement sequences through feedback

    Andrei Khilkevich et al.
    The cerebellum can learn a sequence of responses by using a feedback signal from the previous movement to learn the next one.
    1. Neuroscience

    Intracortical Microstimulation: Regaining the senses of touch and movement

    Victor de Lafuente
    Artificially activating certain neurons in the cortex can make a tetraplegic patient feel naturalistic sensations of skin pressure and arm movement.
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    1. Computational and Systems Biology

    Meta-Research: Centralized scientific communities are less likely to generate replicable results

    Valentin Danchev et al.
    Analysis of data on drug-gene interactions suggests that decentralized collaboration will increase the robustness of scientific findings in biomedical research.

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