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    1. Neuroscience

    The control of tonic pain by active relief learning

    Suyi Zhang et al.
    The brain has a central cortico-striatal learning circuit that suppresses ongoing pain after injury when actively learning about things that could remove the cause of the pain.
    1. Neuroscience

    Development: How do babies feel pain?

    Manon Ranger, Ruth E Grunau
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    1. Neuroscience

    Quantification of gait parameters in freely walking wild type and sensory deprived Drosophila melanogaster

    César S Mendes et al.
    Novel imaging experiments suggest that fruit flies modify their neural circuitry for walking at slow, medium and fast speeds, and that proprioception is not essential for coordinated walking.
    1. Computational and Systems Biology
    2. Neuroscience

    Olfactory receptor neurons use gain control and complementary kinetics to encode intermittent odorant stimuli

    Srinivas Gorur-Shandilya et al.
    Olfactory receptor neurons adapt to odorant mean and variance and use complementary kinetics to preserve the timing of odorant encounters, despite adaptation slowing down transduction.
    1. Neuroscience

    Revealing a novel nociceptive network that links the subthalamic nucleus to pain processing

    Arnaud Pautrat et al.
    The subthalamic nucleus is linked to a nociceptive network and involved in nociceptive processing and perception.
    1. Neuroscience

    Optical control of pain in vivo with a photoactive mGlu5 receptor negative allosteric modulator

    Joan Font et al.
    Localized drug photoactivation provides light-mediated analgesia in behaving mice.
  1. Fabry Disease: Ion channels and neuropathic pain

    Madeleine C Klein, Anne Louise Oaklander
    Pain behaviors in a Fabry mouse model are associated with the accumulation of a fat molecule that disrupts sodium ion channels in small fiber neurons.
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    1. Neuroscience

    Criticality and degeneracy in injury-induced changes in primary afferent excitability and the implications for neuropathic pain

    Stéphanie Ratté et al.
    No single molecular change is uniquely necessary to cause neuropathic changes in primary afferent excitability; multiple different changes are sufficient.
    1. Neuroscience

    The signaling lipid sphingosine 1-phosphate regulates mechanical pain

    Rose Z Hill et al.
    Constitutive sphingosine 1-phosphate signaling via the G-protein coupled receptor S1PR3 in mechanonociceptive somatosensory neurons is required for normal behavioral responses to noxious mechanical stimuli.