104 results found
    1. Computational and Systems Biology
    2. Microbiology and Infectious Disease

    Extensive transmission of microbes along the gastrointestinal tract

    Thomas SB Schmidt et al.
    Microbial populations are continuous along the gastrointestinal tract, with increased transmission in colorectal cancer and rheumatoid arthritis patients.
    1. Developmental Biology
    2. Microbiology and Infectious Disease

    Bacterial colonization stimulates a complex physiological response in the immature human intestinal epithelium

    David R Hill et al.
    Contact with bacteria and subsequent hypoxia promotes functional maturation of the immature gastrointestinal tract.
    1. Computational and Systems Biology
    2. Microbiology and Infectious Disease

    Microbiome: Does disease start in the mouth, the gut or both?

    Andrei Prodan et al.
    Oral bacteria colonize the gut more frequently than previously thought.
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    1. Human Biology and Medicine
    2. Neuroscience

    Obesity: The emerging neurobiology of calorie addiction

    Cristina García-Cáceres, Matthias H Tschöp
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    1. Stem Cells and Regenerative Medicine

    Haematopoietic Stem Cells: Uncovering the origins of a niche

    Jeff M Bernitz, Kateri A Moore
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    1. Human Biology and Medicine
    2. Neuroscience

    Point of View: Coordinating a new approach to basic research into Parkinson’s disease

    Randy Schekman, Ekemini AU Riley
    The ASAP initiative will incentivize collaboration between researchers and encourage open-science practices to improve our understanding of the biology underlying Parkinson's disease.
    1. Developmental Biology

    Organ Plasticity: Paying the costs of reproduction

    Thomas Flatt
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    1. Genetics and Genomics
    2. Microbiology and Infectious Disease

    Host-Pathogen Interactions: What makes the hepatitis C virus evolve?

    Thomas R O'Brien et al.
    Polymorphisms in the IFNL4 gene that affect both the form and the activity of the coded protein are associated with changes in the hepatitis C virus.
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