1,179 results found
    1. Computational and Systems Biology
    2. Immunology and Inflammation

    Computer-guided design of optimal microbial consortia for immune system modulation

    Richard R Stein et al.
    A computational method is presented that quantifies the effect that specific bacteria in the gut have on the immune system and guides the design of therapeutically potent microbial consortia to cure auto-immune disease.
  1. Philosophy of Biology: Health, ecology and the microbiome

    S Andrew Inkpen
    The interactions between communities of microbial species and their human hosts raise questions about the nature of health and disease.
    1. Genetics and Genomics
    2. Microbiology and Infectious Disease

    Epidemiology: Promiscuous bacteria have staying power

    Ruth C Massey, Daniel J Wilson
    Being able to take up DNA from their environment might allow pneumococcal bacteria to colonize the human nose and throat for longer periods of time.
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  2. Research: Theory, models and biology

    Wenying Shou et al.
    Theoretical ideas have a rich history in many areas of biology, and new theories and mathematical models have much to offer in the future.
    Editorial
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    1. Stem Cells and Regenerative Medicine

    Haematopoietic Stem Cells: Uncovering the origins of a niche

    Jeff M Bernitz, Kateri A Moore
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    1. Microbiology and Infectious Disease

    Malaria: On a mission to block transmission

    Amanda Ross, Nicolas MB Brancucci
    The controlled infection of volunteers with Plasmodium falciparum parasites could provide a platform to evaluate new drugs and vaccines aimed at blocking malaria transmission.
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    1. Evolutionary Biology

    Stem Cells: Getting to the heart of cardiovascular evolution in humans

    Alex Pollen, Bryan J Pavlovic
    Differences in the response of cardiomyocytes to oxygen deprivation in humans and chimpanzees may explain why humans are more prone to certain heart diseases.
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