2,717 results found
    1. Immunology and Inflammation

    B cell activation involves nanoscale receptor reorganizations and inside-out signaling by Syk

    Kathrin Kläsener et al.
    Studying the earliest events in B cell activation reveals that the B cell antigen receptor is opened and activated via the phosphorylation and binding by the spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk).
    1. Structural Biology and Molecular Biophysics
    2. Cell Biology

    Labeling proteins inside living cells using external fluorophores for microscopy

    Kai Wen Teng et al.
    A toxin is used to introduce an otherwise cell-impermeant fluorophore-antibody (or some thing which is equally specific) to bind to an intracellular protein which allows for super resolution imaging and single particle tracking inside the living cell.
  1. Nuclear pore assembly proceeds by an inside-out extrusion of the nuclear envelope

    Shotaro Otsuka et al.
    Nuclear pores assemble asymmetrically, by an inside-out evagination of the inner nuclear membrane that grows in diameter and depth until it fuses with the flat outer nuclear membrane.
  2. Plain-language Summaries of Research: An inside guide to eLife digests

    Stuart RF King et al.
    After summarizing over 2,400 articles in plain language, the eLife Features team shares what it has learnt about writing and editing for a broad audience.
    1. Structural Biology and Molecular Biophysics
    2. Cell Biology

    Vesicles: Looking inside the cell

    Eric C Arakel, Blanche Schwappach
    Advances in imaging techniques have shed new light on the structure of vesicles formed by COPI protein complexes.
    Insight
    Available as:
    • HTML
    • PDF
    1. Microbiology and Infectious Disease

    Bacterial Protein Secretion: Looking inside an injection system

    Sophie A Howard, Alain Filloux
    The proteins injected by bacteria into eukaryotic organisms can lead to fates as diverse as death and metamorphosis.
    Insight
    Available as:
    • HTML
    • PDF
    1. Developmental Biology

    Evolutionary Developmental Biology: Sensing oxygen inside and out

    Maria R Stupnikov, Wellington V Cardoso
    Neuroendocrine cells act as oxygen sensors in animals from fish to humans, but the evolutionary origins of these cells are only just becoming clear.
    Insight
    Available as:
    • HTML
    • PDF

Refine your results by:

Type
Research categories