899 results found
    1. Developmental Biology

    Chiral cell sliding drives left-right asymmetric organ twisting

    Mikiko Inaki et al.
    Left-right asymmetric rotation of the Drosophila hindgut is driven by "cell sliding," a novel cellular behavior induced by chiral cell deformation, in which cells change their position relative to subjacent neighbors as sliding directionally.
    1. Developmental Biology
    2. Neuroscience

    Genetic specification of left–right asymmetry in the diaphragm muscles and their motor innervation

    Camille Charoy et al.
    Analysis of embryonic mouse diaphragm reveals muscle and nerve left–right asymmetries set by a Nodal-dependent genetic cascade, which imprints different molecular signatures to left and right motoneurons that shape their innervation pattern.
    1. Physics of Living Systems

    Active torque generation by the actomyosin cell cortex drives left–right symmetry breaking

    Sundar Ram Naganathan et al.
    The actomyosin cytoskeleton generates active chiral torques that lead to left-right asymmetry in C. elegans embryos.
    1. Developmental Biology
    2. Neuroscience

    Sox1a mediates the ability of the parapineal to impart habenular left-right asymmetry

    Ingrid Lekk et al.
    The sox1a gene is required for a small group on neurons on the left side of the brain to influence the generation and left-sided character of their future synaptic partners.
    1. Developmental Biology

    Distinct myocardial lineages break atrial symmetry during cardiogenesis in zebrafish

    Almary Guerra et al.
    A discovery of two previously unknown, molecularly distinct fields of cardiac progenitors in zebrafish provides evidence for cardiac laterality prior to the emergence of cardiac septation and allows novel insights into cardiac development and disease.
    1. Neuroscience

    The right hippocampus leads the bilateral integration of gamma-parsed lateralized information

    Nuria Benito et al.
    High-resolution electrode recordings reveal left-right asymmetry in hippocampal gamma waves.
  1. Research: Publication bias and the canonization of false facts

    Silas Boye Nissen et al.
    Publication bias, in which positive results are preferentially reported by authors and published by journals, can restrict the visibility of evidence against false claims and allow such claims to be canonized inappropriately as facts.
    1. Neuroscience

    Connectomics: Think small

    Luis A Bezares-Calderón, Gáspár Jékely
    Insight
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  2. Living Science: The truth is in the distribution

    Indira M Raman
    There may be as many ways to think about the experience of women in science as there are women in science.
  3. Research: Gender bias in scholarly peer review

    Markus Helmer et al.
    Gender-bias in peer reviewing might persist even when gender-equity is reached because both male and female editors operate with a same-gender preference whose characteristics differ by editor-gender.

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