72 results found
    1. Neuroscience

    Locus coeruleus to basolateral amygdala noradrenergic projections promote anxiety-like behavior

    Jordan G McCall et al.
    Selective activation of locus coeruleus noradrenergic terminals drives anxiety-like behaviors through activation of β-adrenergic receptors in the basolateral amygdala.
    1. Neuroscience

    Dynamic behavior of the locus coeruleus during arousal-related memory processing in a multi-modal 7T fMRI paradigm

    Heidi IL Jacobs et al.
    By combining ultra-high-field imaging with physiological and saliva measures it is established that interactions between locus coeruleus, hippocampus and amygdala vary along emotional memory stages, putatively reflecting distinct cognitive states.
    1. Neuroscience

    Functional dichotomy in spinal- vs prefrontal-projecting locus coeruleus modules splits descending noradrenergic analgesia from ascending aversion and anxiety in rats

    Stefan Hirschberg et al.
    The locus coeruleus is organised into functional modules with subsets of noradrenergic neurones independently projecting to the spinal cord and prefrontal cortex to exert discrete, antithetical modulatory actions on a range of pain-related behaviours.
    1. Neuroscience

    ErbB4 deletion in noradrenergic neurons in the locus coeruleus induces mania-like behavior via elevated catecholamines

    Shu-Xia Cao et al.
    Behavioral and molecular mechanistic studies elaborate the important role of ErbB4 in noradrenergic neurons associated with mania pathogenesis.
    1. Neuroscience

    Noradrenergic projections from the locus coeruleus to the amygdala constrain fear memory reconsolidation

    Josué Haubrich et al.
    The overactivation of noradrenergic inputs to the amygdala during severe fear learning increases memory stability at the expense of lability, rendering the trace resistant to memory destabilization and reconsolidation.
    1. Neuroscience

    Urodynamics: How the brain controls urination

    Anna P Malykhina
    Coordination between the brainstem and the cortex helps to ensure that urination occurs at an appropriate time.
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    1. Neuroscience

    Cellular tolerance at the µ-opioid receptor is phosphorylation dependent

    Seksiri Arttamangkul et al.
    The role of C-terminal phosphorylation is critical for the expression of acute desensitization, trafficking and long-term tolerance to morphine.
    1. Neuroscience

    Brainstem network dynamics underlying the encoding of bladder information

    Anitha Manohar et al.
    Neural and network activity within a pontine-cortical micturition circuit are finely coordinated with urodynamics to assure appropriate voiding behaviors.
    1. Neuroscience

    Dynamic modulation of decision biases by brainstem arousal systems

    Jan Willem de Gee et al.
    Rapid increases in the brain’s level of alertness, or arousal, contribute to variability in decision making by reducing existing biases.

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