7 results found
    1. Physics of Living Systems

    High-speed motility originates from cooperatively pushing and pulling flagella bundles in bilophotrichous bacteria

    Klaas Bente et al.
    Bacteria reach swimming speeds of several hundred body lengths per second and change direction in less than 5 ms by using coordinated flagella bundle agitation.
    1. Evolutionary Biology
    2. Microbiology and Infectious Disease

    An updated phylogeny of the Alphaproteobacteria reveals that the parasitic Rickettsiales and Holosporales have independent origins

    Sergio A Muñoz-Gómez et al.
    Diverse sophisticated phylogenetic analyses update the phylogeny of the Alphaproteobacteria and show that the parasitic Holosporales is a derived group within the Rhodospirillales order which comprises primarily free-living alphaproteobacteria.
    1. Physics of Living Systems
    2. Neuroscience

    Physical limits to magnetogenetics

    Markus Meister
    Recent reports on the ability of biological molecules to sense magnetic fields are found to be inconsistent with basic physical principles.
    1. Neuroscience

    Magnetosensitive neurons mediate geomagnetic orientation in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Andrés Vidal-Gadea et al.
    With the aid of a pair of sensory neurons, the nematode worm C. elegans is able to detect the Earth's magnetic field and use it to navigate towards food sources.
    1. Neuroscience

    Comment on "Magnetosensitive neurons mediate geomagnetic orientation in Caenorhabditis elegans"

    Lukas Landler et al.
    Employing blinded controlled methodology we find no evidence for a magnetic sense in the nematode worm Caenorhabditis elegans.
    1. Neuroscience

    Response to comment on "Magnetosensitive neurons mediate geomagnetic orientation in Caenorhabditis elegans"

    Andres Vidal-Gadea et al.
    A reanalysis of data from a challenge by Landler et al. (2018) and our Vidal-Gadea et al. (2015) study reinforce our original finding that C. elegans is a suitable model system to study magnetoreception.
    1. Structural Biology and Molecular Biophysics
    2. Cell Biology

    Crenactin forms actin-like double helical filaments regulated by arcadin-2

    Thierry Izoré et al.
    Close evolutionary relationship between eukaryotic F-actin and crenarchaeal crenactin protein is supported by a near-atomic cryoEM structure of double helical filaments, that are inhibited by arcadin-2 through binding to crenactin's hydrophobic groove.

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