480 results found
    1. Cancer Biology
    Reproducibility Project

    Reproducibility Project: Cancer Biology

    Edited by Roger J Davis et al.
    Investigating reproducibility in preclinical cancer research.
  1. May 2016

    Episode 29: May 2016

    In this episode we hear about parasitic worms, dog tumours, epilepsy, DNA sequencing classes and social behaviour in mice.
    1. Cancer Biology
    2. Immunology and Inflammation

    Discovery and Translation of Cancer Immunology: A Special Issue

    Edited by Jeffrey Settleman et al.
    eLife is pleased to present a Special Issue to highlight recent advances in the mechanistic understanding of the immune response to cancer cells.
    1. Immunology and Inflammation

    Seroconversion stages COVID19 into distinct pathophysiological states

    Matthew D Galbraith et al.
    Stratification of COVID19 patients using quantitative metrics of seroconversion reveals distinct pathophysiological stages after SARS-CoV-2 infection, including key differences in immune cell types, inflammatory makers, and markers of organ function.
  2. eLife Latest: Welcoming our newest editors

    Bringing a broad range of expertise, 113 researchers join eLife’s editorial board as 12 Reviewing Editors move to the leadership team.
  3. eLife Latest: Welcoming our newest Senior Editors in immunology, cancer, developmental biology and microbiology

    Four Reviewing Editors bring their expertise to eLife’s leadership team.
    1. Cancer Biology
    2. Chromosomes and Gene Expression

    A small protein encoded by a putative lncRNA regulates apoptosis and tumorigenicity in human colorectal cancer cells

    Xiao Ling Li et al.
    Discovery and initial characterization of a conserved small protein translated from a transcript annotated as a human long non-coding RNA.
    1. Cell Biology
    2. Genetics and Genomics

    Manipulation of the human tRNA pool reveals distinct tRNA sets that act in cellular proliferation or cell cycle arrest

    Noa Aharon-Hefetz et al.
    Systematic CRISPR-based editing of tRNA genes revealed that different human cells that span a range of growth rates and different modes of proliferation states require diverse tRNA sets.

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