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    1. Neuroscience

    An open cortico-basal ganglia loop allows limbic control over motor output via the nigrothalamic pathway

    Sho Aoki et al.
    A novel connection from ventral striatum to motor cortex enables emotion and motivation to influence action and motor control.
    1. Neuroscience

    Extrinsic and intrinsic dynamics in movement intermittency

    Damar Susilaradeya et al.
    The rhythmicity in upper-limb tracking movements and associated population dynamics in primary motor cortex is explained by a feedback controller incorporating optimal state estimation.
    1. Neuroscience

    Tagging motor memories with transcranial direct current stimulation allows later artificially-controlled retrieval

    Daichi Nozaki et al.
    Noninvasive brain stimulation can artificially tag and retrieve human motor memories by altering the background activity patterns of the sensorimotor cortex.
    1. Neuroscience

    Motor context dominates output from purkinje cell functional regions during reflexive visuomotor behaviours

    Laura D Knogler et al.
    Purkinje cells of the cerebellum, a conserved vertebrate brain region important for sensorimotor integration, receive sensory and motor information from distinct input streams and are functionally clustered into modules reflecting the larval zebrafish's behavioral repertoire.
    1. Neuroscience

    Beta band oscillations in motor cortex reflect neural population signals that delay movement onset

    Preeya Khanna, Jose M Carmena
    Using a sequential neurofeedback-arm reaching task, a new link is established among population neural activity patterns, generation of beta oscillations, and motor behavior changes.
    1. Neuroscience

    Vacillation, indecision and hesitation in moment-by-moment decoding of monkey motor cortex

    Matthew T Kaufman et al.
    Trial-by-trial analysis of neuronal activity in monkeys performing a decision-making task reveals the neural correlates of behaviours including wavering, hesitation and sudden changes of mind.
    1. Neuroscience

    Cognition: Losing self control

    Luke Miller, Alessandro Farnè
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    1. Neuroscience

    Acute intermittent hypoxia enhances corticospinal synaptic plasticity in humans

    Lasse Christiansen et al.
    Acute intermittent hypoxia is a noninvasive approach that enhances corticospinal function in humans, likely through alterations in corticospinal-motoneuronal synaptic transmission.