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    1. Ecology
    2. Evolutionary Biology

    Comparative genomics explains the evolutionary success of reef-forming corals

    Debashish Bhattacharya et al.
    The analysis of 20 coral genomic datasets provides unprecedented insights into what makes reef-building corals unique, including the evolution of novel gene families involved in biomineralization, signaling and stress responses that have led to their evolutionary success throughout the Phanerozoic Eon.
    1. Plant Biology

    A chloroplast retrograde signal, 3’-phosphoadenosine 5’-phosphate, acts as a secondary messenger in abscisic acid signaling in stomatal closure and germination

    Wannarat Pornsiriwong et al.
    Molecular signals from chloroplasts can synergistically interact with the plant hormone, abscisic acid (ABA), to regulate non-canonical signaling pathways mediating fundamental cellular processes including stomatal closure, seed dormancy and germination.
    1. Biochemistry and Chemical Biology
    2. Cell Biology

    Proteasome storage granules protect proteasomes from autophagic degradation upon carbon starvation

    Richard S Marshall, Richard D Vierstra
    Proteasomes are protected from autophagic elimination upon carbon starvation by sequestration into cytoplasmic storage granules, which aid cell fitness by providing a cache of proteasomes that can be rapidly remobilized when carbon availability improves.
    1. Biochemistry and Chemical Biology
    2. Microbiology and Infectious Disease

    A unifying mechanism for the biogenesis of membrane proteins co-operatively integrated by the Sec and Tat pathways

    Fiona J Tooke et al.
    Bioinformatics and experimental approaches identify families of membrane proteins requiring the co-ordinated action of the Sec pathway and Tat pathways for their integration and define features of the polypeptides that mediate interaction with these pathways.
    1. Ecology
    2. Microbiology and Infectious Disease

    Ecology and evolution of viruses infecting uncultivated SUP05 bacteria as revealed by single-cell- and meta-genomics

    Simon Roux et al.
    Single-cell amplified genome sequencing uncovers virus-host interactions in uncultivated sulfur-oxidizing bacteria with relevance to coupled biogeochemical cycling in marine oxygen minimum zones.
    1. Plant Biology
    2. Evolutionary Biology

    Herbivory-induced volatiles function as defenses increasing fitness of the native plant Nicotiana attenuata in nature

    Meredith C Schuman et al.
    A 2-year field study has demonstrated that volatile compounds produced by plants when they are attacked by herbivores act as defenses by attracting predators to the herbivores and increasing the reproduction of the plants.
    1. Evolutionary Biology

    Phenotypic plasticity as a mechanism of cave colonization and adaptation

    Helena Bilandžija et al.
    Astyanax mexicanus surface-dwelling fish exposed to complete darkness develop many traits resembling cavefish adaptations by phenotypic plasticity in a single generation.
    1. Evolutionary Biology

    Genetic transformation of Spizellomyces punctatus, a resource for studying chytrid biology and evolutionary cell biology

    Edgar M Medina et al.
    Spizellomycespunctatusis a genetically tractable chytrid and model organism for comparative cell biology for understanding evolution of the cell cycle, actin dynamics, and cellularization in fungi and early eukaryotes.
    1. Biochemistry and Chemical Biology
    2. Plant Biology

    Adaptation of hydroxymethylbutenyl diphosphate reductase enables volatile isoprenoid production

    Mareike Bongers et al.
    Differences in HDR product preference present a novel mechanism in plants to control substrate availability for short- and long-chain isoprenoids.
    1. Cell Biology
    2. Plant Biology

    The GluTR-binding protein is the heme-binding factor for feedback control of glutamyl-tRNA reductase

    Andreas S Richter et al.
    Heme-dependent feedback inhibition of rate-limiting ALA-synthesis of plant tetrapyrrole biosynthesis depends on binding of heme to glutamyl-tRNA reductase-binding protein.