16 results found
    1. Evolutionary Biology

    New footprints from Laetoli (Tanzania) provide evidence for marked body size variation in early hominins

    Fidelis T Masao et al.
    Bipedal footprints made 3.66 million years ago provide the clearest available evidence to date of the occurrence of marked body size variation in Australopithecus afarensis..
    1. Evolutionary Biology
    2. Neuroscience

    Quantitative uniqueness of human brain evolution revealed through phylogenetic comparative analysis

    Ian F Miller et al.
    The exceptionally large size of the human brain is the result of accelerating evolution towards larger brains in hominins, but is not the product of neocortical expansion.
    1. Evolutionary Biology
    2. Plant Biology

    An unexpected noncarpellate epigynous flower from the Jurassic of China

    Qiang Fu et al.
    Flowers did bloom in the Early Jurassic.
  1. Anthropology in the bones: an interview with Zach Cofran

    Zach Cofran's career as a paleoanthropologist has taken him from the United States to Kazakhstan and South Africa, where he was part of the team that discovered the new hominin species, Homo naledi. He has just started a new job as an Assistant Professor of Anthropology at Vassar College, New York.
    1. Ecology
    2. Evolutionary Biology

    Lichen mimesis in mid-Mesozoic lacewings

    Hui Fang et al.
    The earliest fossil evidence of a mimetic relationship between the Jurassic moth lacewing Lichenipolystoechotes and its co-occurring fossil lichen Daohugouthallus predates modern lichen-insect associations by 165 million years.
    1. Biochemistry and Chemical Biology
    2. Evolutionary Biology

    Protein sequences bound to mineral surfaces persist into deep time

    Beatrice Demarchi et al.
    A chemically unstable ostrich eggshell peptide survives for at least 3.8 million years at the equator, stabilized by strong mineral interactions.
    1. Ecology
    2. Evolutionary Biology

    The African ape-like foot of Ardipithecus ramidus and its implications for the origin of bipedalism

    Thomas Cody Prang
    The most recent common ancestor of humans, chimpanzees, and bonobos possessed a foot adapted to terrestrial quadrupedalism and climbing.
    1. Evolutionary Biology

    A non-archaeopterygid avialan theropod from the Late Jurassic of southern Germany

    Oliver WM Rauhut et al.
    A new taxon from the Late Jurassic of southern Germany represents the second volant bird known from that time period and documents the improvement of flapping flight in bird evolution.
    1. Ecology

    Oxygen isotopes suggest elevated thermometabolism within multiple Permo-Triassic therapsid clades

    Kévin Rey et al.
    Two therapsid clades, dicynodonts and cynodonts, independently acquired and developed an endotherm-like thermoregulation during the Late Permian period, that probably helped them to survive the major global climate and environmental fluctuations of the end-Permian.
    1. Evolutionary Biology

    Homo naledi, a new species of the genus Homo from the Dinaledi Chamber, South Africa

    Lee R Berger et al.
    A new hominin species has been unearthed in the Dinaledi Chamber of the Rising Star cave system in the largest assemblage of a single species of hominins yet discovered in Africa.

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