367 results found
    1. Neuroscience

    Bottom-up and top-down influences at untrained conditions determine perceptual learning specificity and transfer

    Ying-Zi Xiong et al.
    Perceptual learning is specific because of the absence of bottom-up stimulation and top-down modulation at the untrained conditions.
    1. Neuroscience

    Mesolimbic confidence signals guide perceptual learning in the absence of external feedback

    Matthias Guggenmos et al.
    Neural confidence signals can take the role of reward signals and explain perceptual learning without external feedback as a form of internal reinforcement learning.
    1. Neuroscience

    GABA, not BOLD, reveals dissociable learning-dependent plasticity mechanisms in the human brain

    Polytimi Frangou et al.
    Combining GABA with fMRI measurements in the human brain uncovers distinct suppression mechanisms that optimize perceptual decisions through learning and experience-dependent plasticity in the visual cortex.
    1. Neuroscience

    Reinforcement biases subsequent perceptual decisions when confidence is low, a widespread behavioral phenomenon

    Armin Lak et al.
    Confidence-dependent reinforcement learning is active and produces trial-to-trial choice updating even in well-learned perceptual decisions without explicit reward biases, across species and sensory modalities.
    1. Neuroscience

    Developmental deprivation-induced perceptual and cortical processing deficits in awake-behaving animals

    Justin D Yao, Dan H Sanes
    Developmental hearing loss causes perceptual deficits that are best explained by degraded auditory cortical encoding that is recorded during task performance.
    1. Neuroscience

    Human Intelligence: What single neurons can tell us

    Elaine N Miller, Chet C Sherwood
    IQ scores are correlated with the morphology and activity of certain neurons in the human temporal cortex.
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    1. Neuroscience

    Face Recognition: Babies get it right

    Hillary Hadley , Lisa Scott
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    1. Neuroscience

    Visual Cognition: In sight, in mind

    Mariam Aly
    A region of the brain called the perirhinal cortex represents both what things look like and what they mean.
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    1. Neuroscience

    Physical Inference: How the brain represents mass

    Grant Fairchild, Jacqueline C Snow
    New fMRI experiments and machine learning are helping to identify how the mass of objects is processed in the brain.
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