2,666 results found
  1. August 2015

    Episode 22: August 2015

    In this episode we hear about cancer, dengue fever, sperm DNA and neurons that are sensitive to magnetic fields.
    1. Cancer Biology
    Reproducibility Project

    Reproducibility Project: Cancer Biology

    Edited by Roger J Davis et al.
    Investigating reproducibility in preclinical cancer research.
  2. Meta-research

    Meta-Research: A Collection of Articles

    Edited by Peter A Rodgers
    The study of science itself is a growing field of research.
  3. May 2015

    Episode 20: May 2015

    In this episode we hear about echolocation, bacteriophages, babies and pain, a neural code for food abundance, and how zebrafish can make their own sunscreen.
  4. Episode 67: June 2020

    In this episode, we hear about a controversial claim in plant science, why we cannot get enough of chocolate, HIV in women, sex as a biological variable, and why not all zebrafish like to mingle.
  5. A seed next to a sign saying "nothing to declare"

    Episode 64: February 2020

    In this episode we hear about genetic privacy, plants with three parents, using cannabis to treat endometriosis, a new type of hearing test and how we can enjoy a cuddle.
  6. Group of raised hands

    Episode 61: October 2019

    In this episode we hear about parents passing on new mutations, a genetic mystery 100 years in the making, the experiences of early-career group leaders, and more.
  7. Episode 47: May 2018

    In this episode, we hear about echolocation in bats, open science, a new use for aspirin, brain topography, and combining science and parenthood.
    1. Structural Biology and Molecular Biophysics
    2. Cell Biology

    Single-protein detection in crowded molecular environments in cryo-EM images

    J Peter Rickgauer et al.
    High-resolution template matching makes small, densely embedded proteins detectable.
    1. Neuroscience

    A predictive focus of gain modulation encodes target trajectories in insect vision

    Steven D Wiederman et al.
    Visual neurons in the dragonfly predict the path of a moving target, even when it is occluded or crosses from one eye to the other.

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