5,818 results found
    1. Neuroscience

    Maternal Behavior: Why mother rats protect their children

    Ksenia Z Meyza, Ewelina Knapska
    The presence of the hormone oxytocin in the central amygdala makes a mother rat willing to put her life in danger in order to protect her offspring.
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    1. Cancer Biology

    Reproducibility in Cancer Biology: Making sense of replications

    Brian A Nosek, Timothy M Errington
    The first results from the Reproducibility Project: Cancer Biology suggest that there is scope for improving reproducibility in pre-clinical cancer research.
    1. Ecology
    2. Evolutionary Biology

    Positive and negative incentive contrasts lead to relative value perception in ants

    Stephanie Wendt et al.
    Relative value perception, a basic tenant of Behavioural Economics, is demonstrated in an insect, and further shown to be driven by cognitive processes and induced by private and social information.
    1. Ecology
    2. Evolutionary Biology

    Nitric oxide radicals are emitted by wasp eggs to kill mold fungi

    Erhard Strohm et al.
    To protect their food and themselves against detrimental mould fungi, the eggs of a wasp species synthesize and emit remarkable amounts of gaseous nitrogen oxides that are highly effective antimicrobials.
  1. Launch Binder

    Integrating Binder and Stencila – the building blocks to increased open communication and transparency

    Find out how this new project can help researchers communicate their work openly, collaborate with other scientists and ensure the high quality and transparency of their workflow and findings.
  2. Binder and JupyterHub logos

    Introducing Binder 2.0 — share your interactive research environment

    The Project Jupyter team shares its reboot of Binder, the tool that allows researchers to make their GitHub repositories executable by others.
    1. Evolutionary Biology
    2. Genetics and Genomics

    Aging: A new defense in the battle of the sexes

    George L Sutphin
    Young Caenorhabditis elegans hermaphrodites use their own sperm to protect against the negative consequences of mating.
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