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    1. Cancer Biology

    Selective eradication of cancer displaying hyperactive Akt by exploiting the metabolic consequences of Akt activation

    Veronique Nogueira et al.
    Exploiting the metabolic consequences of Akt activation in prostate cancer for therapeutic interventions that circumvent Akt inhibition therapy.
    1. Cell Biology
    2. Human Biology and Medicine

    Prostate Cancer: SPOP the mutation

    Leah Rider, Scott D Cramer
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    1. Human Biology and Medicine

    Cancer: Designer antiandrogens join the race against drug resistance

    Jatinder S Josan, John A Katzenellenbogen
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    1. Cancer Biology
    2. Human Biology and Medicine

    Tumor copy number alteration burden is a pan-cancer prognostic factor associated with recurrence and death

    Haley Hieronymus et al.
    The percentage of a tumor’s genome with alterations in copy number is correlated with increased mortality across a range of tumor types and can be measured using a clinically approved sequencing assay.
    1. Cell Biology
    2. Computational and Systems Biology

    Human kinetochores are swivel joints that mediate microtubule attachments

    Chris A Smith et al.
    The outer domain of the kinetochore can rotate (swivel) around the centromere, and this rather than intra-kinetochore stretching is coupled to anaphase onset.
    1. Cell Biology
    2. Chromosomes and Gene Expression

    Chromosome Segregation: Freewheeling sisters cause problems

    Takashi Akera, Michael A Lampson
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    1. Cell Biology
    2. Human Biology and Medicine

    Cancer Metabolism: Partners in the Warburg effect

    Joshua D Rabinowitz, Hilary A Coller
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    1. Cancer Biology

    Science Forum: Challenges in validating candidate therapeutic targets in cancer

    Jeffrey Settleman et al.
    More than 30 published articles have suggested that a protein kinase called MELK is an attractive therapeutic target in human cancer, but three recent reports describe compelling evidence that it is not.
    1. Physics of Living Systems
    2. Neuroscience

    Magnetogenetics: Problems on the back of an envelope

    Polina Anikeeva, Alan Jasanoff
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