1,835 results found
    1. Structural Biology and Molecular Biophysics

    Structural basis of ribosomal peptide macrocyclization in plants

    Joel Haywood et al.
    The first crystal structure of an active plant asparaginyl endopeptidase reveals a tetrahedral intermediate state in its active site, which may help to explain why these enzymes have been independently recruited to perform peptide macrocyclization.
    1. Computational and Systems Biology

    Quantitative time-resolved analysis reveals intricate, differential regulation of standard- and immuno-proteasomes

    Juliane Liepe et al.
    Experimental and computational analyses reveal how proteasomal hydrolysis is regulated and show that peptide transport is the rate-limiting step and the main differentiating factor between human standard- and immuno-proteasomes.
    1. Biochemistry and Chemical Biology
    2. Cell Biology

    Roles of the membrane-reentrant β-hairpin-like loop of RseP protease in selective substrate cleavage

    Koichiro Akiyama et al.
    Mutational analysis and biochemical experiments suggest that the conserved β-hairpin-like membrane-reentrant loop of RseP - an S2P family intramembrane cleaving protease - helps to discriminate substrates by directly interacting with their transmembrane segments.
    1. Structural Biology and Molecular Biophysics

    Trifunctional cross-linker for mapping protein-protein interaction networks and comparing protein conformational states

    Dan Tan et al.
    An enrichable cross-linker with optional isotope labeling quadruples the number of cross-linked peptides identified from high-complexity samples, enhancing proteome-wide analysis of protein-protein interactions and protein conformational changes by mass spectrometry.
    1. Cell Biology

    Proteasomes: Nrf1 to the rescue

    Jin Ye
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    1. Cancer Biology
    2. Human Biology and Medicine

    Cancer Therapeutics: Partial loss of genes might open therapeutic window

    Bo Liu, Omar Abdel-Wahab
    The loss of genes that encode RNA splicing factors weakens cancer cells in a way that could be exploited by new approaches to treatment.
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