123 results found
    1. Cancer Biology

    Reproducibility in Cancer Biology: Pseudogenes, RNAs and new reproducibility norms

    George A Calin
    The partial success of a study to reproduce experiments that linked pseudogenes and cancer proves that understanding RNA networks is more complicated than expected.
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    1. Cell Biology
    2. Chromosomes and Gene Expression

    Many lncRNAs, 5’UTRs, and pseudogenes are translated and some are likely to express functional proteins

    Zhe Ji et al.
    Thousands of "noncoding" RNAs, 5' "untranslated" regions, and pseudogenes in humans are actually translated, and some of these are likely to express functional proteins.
    1. Cancer Biology

    Replication Study: A coding-independent function of gene and pseudogene mRNAs regulates tumour biology

    John Kerwin et al.
    Editors' Summary: This Replication Study has reproduced some parts of the original paper but it also contains results that are not consistent with other parts of the original paper.
    1. Chromosomes and Gene Expression

    A mammalian pseudogene lncRNA at the interface of inflammation and anti-inflammatory therapeutics

    Nicole A Rapicavoli et al.
    A long non-coding RNA regulates the expression of genes that encode proteins involved in the inflammatory response.
    1. Chromosomes and Gene Expression
    2. Evolutionary Biology

    The life cycle of Drosophila orphan genes

    Nicola Palmieri et al.
    The short lifetime of orphan genes is a major factor explaining the stability of gene number in Drosophila.
    1. Computational and Systems Biology
    2. Chromosomes and Gene Expression

    Thousands of novel translated open reading frames in humans inferred by ribosome footprint profiling

    Anil Raj et al.
    Over 7,000 novel translated sequences have been identified from human cells, including several hundred in annotated noncoding RNA, pseudogenes and de novo assembled transcripts.
    1. Microbiology and Infectious Disease

    Evolution: ANP32B, or not to be, that is the question for influenza virus

    Steven F Baker, Andrew Mehle
    The evolutionary history of ANP32 proteins impacts how the influenza virus jumps from birds to mammals.
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