7 results found
    1. Neuroscience

    Microsecond interaural time difference discrimination restored by cochlear implants after neonatal deafness

    Nicole Rosskothen-Kuhl et al.
    Early deaf human CI users are often insensitive to sub-millisecond interaural time differences (ITDs); however, with synchronized CIs, early deafened rats learned to lateralize small ITDs near 50 µs.
    1. Neuroscience

    Individual differences in selective attention predict speech identification at a cocktail party

    Daniel Oberfeld, Felicitas Klöckner-Nowotny
    Cocktail-party listening performance in normal-hearing listeners is associated with the ability to focus attention on a target stimulus in the presence of distractors.
    1. Neuroscience

    Detecting changes in dynamic and complex acoustic environments

    Yves Boubenec et al.
    Psychophysics experiments and EEG recordings reveal that people's performance in detecting unexpected changes in complex auditory scenes can be modeled as a process of sensory evidence accumulation.
    1. Neuroscience

    Temporal selectivity declines in the aging human auditory cortex

    Julia Erb et al.
    The aged human auditory cortex shows preserved tonotopy, but temporal modulations are represented with a markedly broader tuning, highlighting decreased temporal selectivity as a hallmark of the aging auditory cortex.
    1. Neuroscience

    The role of cochlear place coding in the perception of frequency modulation

    Kelly L Whiteford et al.
    Human perceptual sensitivity to frequency modulation across the hearing range can be explained by a unitary neural code based on neural responses to amplitude modulation and fidelity of cochlear tuning.
    1. Neuroscience

    Segregation of complex acoustic scenes based on temporal coherence

    Sundeep Teki et al.
    Experiments with realistic acoustic stimuli have revealed that humans distinguish salient sounds from background noise by integrating frequency and temporal information.
    1. Neuroscience

    Long-term implicit memory for sequential auditory patterns in humans

    Roberta Bianco et al.
    Human listeners rapidly form robust, long lasting (up to 7 weeks) memories of rarely encountered, featureless sound sequences presented among many similar stimuli.

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